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Channel modeling approaches to wireless system design and analysis

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Channel modeling approaches to wireless system design and analysis
Identifier
ETD_2897
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056456
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
MIMO systems--Design
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Ray tracing algorithms
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Stochastic models
Abstract (type = abstract)
In wireless communications, it is common practice to use mathematical models for describing the radio channel. One approach is stochastic modeling, in which the key properties of the signal propagation (e.g., multipath fading) are captured by probability distributions. If the interest pertains to a specific environment, an alternative approach is to measure channel responses for a very large population of transmit-receive (T-R) paths; this is an effective but labor-intensive approach. An alternative approach that is less costly and more flexible is to use environment simulators. These are computer programs that (1) emulate the physical environment; (2) use wave propagation physics to predict the radio signal produced at any receive point from any transmit point; and (3) account for transmission through walls and diffraction around walls. This works best when the user has site-specific information on the geometry and structure materials When the physical environment is well-specified, such as indoor areas where the layouts and materials of walls, floors and ceilings are known, environment simulation can be employed on a very large scale with very little effort. In this thesis we focus on environment simulators based on ray-tracing. The major contribution is to demonstrate and evaluate the use of ray tracing for characterizing wireless channels and analyzing algorithms for various applications. We initially demonstrate, via comparisons with physical measurements, the statistical accuracy of ray-tracing predictions of channel behavior. The comparisons are made for three parameters that largely characterize a radio path's behavior: Path loss; Ricean K-factor; and RMS delay spread. The comparisons show good agreement over the set of paths measured and simulated, establishing confidence that a well-designed radio simulator can be used reliably in system studies. Environment-specific models generally assume the channel response is non-varying over time if both ends of the path are fixed. However, in real environments, channel responses vary over time, e.g. due to movement of objects (or people) near the transmission path. We have measured the channel response in an office building under different scenarios of environment dynamics. We stochastically modeled the time variation of the channel response about the mean using autoregressive processes and showed that this can lead to an accurate representation. Our approach could be used to model the time-varying tap gains to further augment the realism of ray-tracing simulations. We then demonstrate several applications in wireless system design where ray-tracing could be exploited. First, we present an algorithm called Emitter Localization and Visualization (ELVIS) for localizing emitters by back-propagating the received signals via back-ray tracing. Second, we present a statistical path loss model derived from data simulated using a ray tracing tool. The characterization used is a nonlinear curve of the dB path loss to the log-distance, with a random variation about that curve due to shadow fading. Third, we devise an evaluation approach for densely populated urban wireless systems using MIMO links, wherein the location-specific channel gains are determined via ray-tracing. We compare and quantify the data rate performances of MIMO systems for various transmission schemes and antenna configurations; we present algorithms for adapting the MIMO transmission mode to varying channel conditions as a mobile moves along a given trajectory; and we treat the case of multiple bases to cover a full urban neighborhood and investigate the relationship among frequency reuse, co-channel interference and achievable data rate.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xv, 86 p. : ill.
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Aliye Özge Kaya
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
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Kaya
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Aliye Özge
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1980-
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Aliye Özge Kaya
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Trappe
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Wade
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Wade Trappe
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Greenstein
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Larry J.
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co-chair
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Advisory Committee
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Larry J. Greenstein
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Mandayam
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Narayan
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Narayan Mandayam
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NamePart (type = family)
Chizhik
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Dmitry
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outside member
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Advisory Committee
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Dmitry Chizhik
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NamePart
Rutgers University
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degree grantor
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NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
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xx
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TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3959H98
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kaya
GivenName
Aliye Özge
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-10-01 00:40:50
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Aliye Özge Kaya
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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2611200
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