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Thermosensitive splicing of a clock gene and seasonal adaptation

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Thermosensitive splicing of a clock gene and seasonal adaptation
Identifier
ETD_2816
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056572
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Drosophila
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Circadian rhythms
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Genetic regulation
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Sleep-wake cycle
Abstract (type = abstract)
Prior work showed that the thermosensitive splicing of an intron found in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene, termed dmpi8 (Drosophila melanogaster per intron 8), is critical for temperature-induced adjustments in the distribution of daily activity. Using a simplified cell culture system, we showed that an intricate balance between multiple suboptimal splicing signals is the underlying molecular basis for the thermosensitive splicing of dmpi8. We confirmed the physiological significance of this model in transgenic Drosophila by altering the splice site strengths of dmpi8. Presumably, at higher temperatures, the interaction between the spliceosome and the sub-optimal splicing signals is weaker and hence results in less efficient splicing. Further studies of Drosophila species from different geographical regions strongly suggest that the thermal regulation in the splicing efficiency of the D. melanogaster per 3’-terminal intron is an important mechanism for seasonal adaptation in this species. Temperature dependent splicing of dmpi8 contributed to the ability of cosmopolitan D. melanogaster to adapt to temperate regions by providing a mechanism that can extent midday siesta during the long warm days typical of temperate climates. However, Drosophila species indigenous to Afro-equatorial regions, wherein temperature undergoes little seasonal variation, do not exhibit thermal adjustments in their daily activity patterns. Intriguingly, 3’-terminal introns were also found in their per genes, but these introns have strong splice sites and are not spliced in a thermosensitive manner. Thus, the strengths of key splicing signals underlies species-specific differences in the thermosensitivities of per 3’-terminal intron removal that correlate with the ability to adjust daily activity patterns in a temperature dependent manner. In related work we identified natural polymorphisms in non-intronic regions of the per 3’-UTR that modulate dmpi8 splicing. Preliminary analysis suggests that the effects of some of these polymorphisms might be mediated by SR proteins. Finally, we also identified a novel role for the per 3’-terminal intron on sleep homeostasis. In summary, this thesis utilized a multi-faceted strategy, including simplified mechanistic studies and comparative analysis, which led to new ecological and evolutionary perspectives on the role of circadian clock function on thermal and seasonal adaptation.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xii, 163 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kwang Huei Low
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Low
NamePart (type = given)
Kwang Huei
NamePart (type = date)
1978-
Role
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author
DisplayForm
Kwang Huei Low
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Edery
NamePart (type = given)
Isaac
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Isaac Edery
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gunderson
NamePart (type = given)
Samuel
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Samuel Gunderson
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Belden
NamePart (type = given)
William
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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William Belden
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Liu
NamePart (type = given)
Fang
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Fang Liu
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZG6S1V
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Low
GivenName
Kwang Huei
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-08-18 21:58:35
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Kwang Huei Low
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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4945920
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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