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Stiffness and progressive damage analysis on random chopped fiber composite using FEM

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Stiffness and progressive damage analysis on random chopped fiber composite using FEM
Identifier
ETD_2953
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056698
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Elastic analysis (Engineering)
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Composite materials in automobiles
Abstract (type = abstract)
The need of vehicle weight reduction and fuel efficiency in the automotive industry calls for substituting traditional materials with lightweight ones. With the maturity of the preforming technologies, random chopped fiber composites have received increasing attention in recent years as replacement for traditional structural materials. In order to expand their application, accurate material characterization is required. Material properties such as effective elastic stiffness, material damage behavior, and strength are of primary interest. In this thesis, a micro-mechanics based finite element analysis method for the random chopped fiber composite is developed. In order to obtain the effective material properties of random chopped fiber composites, a modified random sequential adsorption technique is proposed to generate the representative volume element of random chopped fiber composites. In the three-dimensional representative volume element generation algorithm, a fiber is bended locally to avoid intersecting other fibers and consequently to overcome the "jamming limit" in the existing techniques. The volume fraction of a representative volume element generated by the modified random sequential adsorption is as high as that of the specimens provided by industry, which is about 35% to 40%. A homogenization scheme is applied to the finite element solution of the boundary value problem, defined in the representative volume element with proper boundary conditions, to compute the effective elastic stiffness constants of the composite. An automatic procedure based on a moving window technique is also presented to determine the proper size of the representative volume element of the random chopped fiber composite. Investigation on the damage behavior of the composite is carried out by using constituent's mechanical properties. Three damage mechanisms are considered, namely, the matrix cracking, interfacial debonding, and fiber breakage. The cohesive zone model is adopted to represent interfacial debonding. The effect of matrix cracking is accounted for by a modified von Mises yield criterion and subsequently a gradual material degradation model. Fiber breakage is modeled by a stress-based failure criterion and a sudden material degradation model. Effects of interfacial strength, critical energy release rate, and residual thermal stress on the overall performance of the composite are investigated. The results of the finite element analysis are validated by experimental data.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xiii, 137 p. : ill.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Yi Pan
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pan
NamePart (type = given)
Yi
NamePart (type = date)
1974-
Role
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author
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YI PAN
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pelegri
NamePart (type = given)
Assimina A.
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Assimina A. Pelegri
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dill
NamePart (type = given)
Ellis H.
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Ellis H. Dill
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Weng
NamePart (type = given)
George J.
Role
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internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
George J. Weng
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shreiber
NamePart (type = given)
David I.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
David I. Shreiber
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3RB74B5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
PAN
GivenName
YI
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-09-30 00:27:35
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
YI PAN
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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ETD
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application/pdf
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application/x-tar
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13547520
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