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Creating deliberation in the context of social conflict

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Creating deliberation in the context of social conflict
SubTitle
the examination of mediator practices for shaping an interactivity in dispute mediation
Identifier
ETD_2912
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056811
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mediation--United States
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Divorce mediation--United States
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social interaction--United States
Subject (ID = SBJ-5); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Interpersonal conflict--United States
Abstract (type = abstract)
The dissertation explored how deliberative activity is constructed within ongoing social conflict. The study examined mediator actions for keeping the disputants on task – that is, on negotiating plans about caring for their children. This focus enabled an empirical investigation of three interrelated theoretical interests: (1) how an institutionally preferred form of interactivity is constructed in the ongoing course of interaction, (2) the role of the mediator as an ostensible designer of communication activity, and (3) the relationship between interaction and reasoning. An existing
collection of 18 transcripts from audio recordings of mediation sessions at a mediation center in the western United States served as a source of interactional data. The participants of mediation sessions were eight mediators and 17 divorcing or divorced couples. The main focus of observation was on mediator communicative practices for keeping disputants on task. These were observed by attending to the word choices of mediators and their language actions evident across a corpus of transcripts. As the
dialogue quality is a mutual achievement of all the participants, not just the mediator, the center of attention was also on different linguistic and interactional resources disputants provide in the course of interaction. The simple categories were useful for getting at higher order concepts such as topics and dialogue activities. There were four main findings from the empirical study. First, an institutionally preferred form of interactivity is constructed ongoing, often implicit, negotiation of what is on or off task through the
uses of linguistic and interactional “materials” available in the moment to the participants. Second, mediators’ uses of language to make references, establish topics,
and launch dialogue activities are design moves that signal what is on-task and thus articulate the deliberative activity. Third, mediators construct their interventions in such a way as to balance concerns for face and the institutional goal for interaction. Fourth,
argument and reasoning are constituted through interaction that imposes various constraints on what contributions are appropriate in mediation talk.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
xi, 342 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Alena L. Vasilyeva
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vasilyeva
NamePart (type = given)
Alena L.
NamePart (type = date)
1972-
Role
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author
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Alena Vasilyeva
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aakhus
NamePart (type = given)
Mark
Role
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chair
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
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Mark Aakhus
Name (ID = NAME-3); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mokros
NamePart (type = given)
Hartmut B.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Hartmut B. Mokros
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robinson
NamePart (type = given)
Jeffrey D.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Jeffrey D. Robinson
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Walton
NamePart (type = given)
Douglas
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Douglas Walton
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T32807BV
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Vasilyeva
GivenName
Alena
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-09-27 17:36:24
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Alena Vasilyeva
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

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ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1208320
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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