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Improving language

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TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo (ID = T-1)
Title
Improving language
SubTitle
Victorian literature and the civilizing process
Identifier
ETD_2841
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000056866
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2); (type = code)
eng
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
Subject (ID = SBJ-1); (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
Subject (ID = SBJ-2); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English literature--19th century
Subject (ID = SBJ-3); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Civilization, Modern--British influences
Subject (ID = SBJ-4); (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Civilization, Modern, in literature
Abstract (type = abstract)
Whereas “civilization” has often been dismissed in nineteenth-century studies as a rallying cry for empire, this dissertation offers a critical re-evaluation of how the
Victorians understood this concept and its implications for literature’s educational possibilities. Integrating Norbert Elias’s theory of the civilizing process into a critical framework that draws on literary linguistics and rhetorical studies, my first chapter studies nineteenth-century writings from a range of disciplines – including economics, sociology, and linguistics – to show that “civilization” represented a key site for Victorian writers to reflect holistically on wider processes of social change and their linguistic dimensions. The second chapter analyzes the poetics of John Stuart Mill and
Matthew Arnold in the context of this discourse. Arguing that the discourse of civilization provides a crucial framework for understanding how these thinkers conceived literary language as “improving,” I reveal the impact of this discourse on the period’s most influential theories about literature’s educational value. While the first part of the dissertation considers the literary implications of “civilization” on the level of theory, the
second part explores how Victorian poets and novelists addressed these implications in practice by considering classic texts such as Jane Eyre and David Copperfield alongside less canonical female Bildungsromane and children’s adventure tales. Chapter Three begins by demonstrating how a range of Victorian genres dramatize and reflect on the
civilizing process, then focuses specifically on narratives of writers’ Bildung (formation). I argue that these Bildungsromane show particularly clearly how Victorian writers’ creative engagement with the discourse of civilization enables them to construct a model of literary language that facilitates social integration, while fostering a value for individuality and inventiveness essential to active participation in social processes. Turning to narratives of feminine Bildung like Margaret Oliphant’s Miss Marjoribanks and Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, the concluding chapter illustrates how writers imagined how such private pastimes as reading might sustain wider civilizing trends. By exploiting the
links between gender and genre, these texts are able, I suggest, to conceive the possibility of altering Victorian society’s deeply ingrained sexism through the strategic appropriation – rather than outright rejection – of its gendered norms.
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
Extent
x, 372 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
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text/xml
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Paul L. Yeoh
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yeoh
NamePart (type = given)
Paul L.
NamePart (type = date)
1977-
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author
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Paul Yeoh
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = personal)
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Flint
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Kate
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chair
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Advisory Committee
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Kate Flint
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McKeon
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Michael
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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Michael McKeon
Name (ID = NAME-4); (type = personal)
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Levine
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George
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internal member
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Advisory Committee
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George Levine
Name (ID = NAME-5); (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Birch
NamePart (type = given)
Dinah
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
DisplayForm
Dinah Birch
Name (ID = NAME-1); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (ID = NAME-2); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2010
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2010-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3KD1XNK
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = GS); (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (ID = PRH-1); (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Yeoh
GivenName
Paul
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent (ID = RE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
Permission or license
DateTime
2010-09-02 09:23:47
AssociatedEntity (ID = AE-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Role
Copyright holder
Name
Paul Yeoh
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject (ID = AO-1); (AUTHORITY = rulib)
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
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Technical

ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
1198080
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
c2e8a6d0a4d3dc7224d35c4bc37dd4518cfef661
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