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Shifts in microbial community structure as a result of a wildfire in the New Jersey Pinelands

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TitleInfo
Title
Shifts in microbial community structure as a
result of a wildfire in the New Jersey Pinelands
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mikita
NamePart (type = given)
Robyn Ann
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Robyn Mikita
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tate
NamePart (type = given)
Robert L
DisplayForm
Robert L Tate
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Strom
NamePart (type = given)
Peter F
DisplayForm
Peter F Strom
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Young
NamePart (type = given)
Lily Y
DisplayForm
Lily Y Young
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kelly
NamePart (type = given)
John J
DisplayForm
John J Kelly
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-01
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
As the threat of wildfires in the United States increases due to global warming, understanding their effects on the soil biological community becomes central to recovery efforts. Therefore, it is important to study microbial community dynamics in forest soils impacted by fires from the view of elucidating how the new state compares with the original state of the microbial community. For this study, wildfires were hypothesized to cause a shift in the microbial community structure with dominant microbes being those best capable of responding to changes in their environment caused by the perturbation. The objectives of this research were to examine the recovery of the forest soil microbial communities after a wildfire and to investigate the state of the communities more than two years post-fire. After a wildfire occurred in the New Jersey Pinelands in 2007, soil samples were collected from the organic and mineral layers of two severely burned sites and an unburned control site over the span of two years following the fire. Microbial community composition was evaluated by principal component analysis and multivariate analysis of variance of molecular fingerprint data for bacterial, archaeal, and fungal-specific amplicons from denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The bacterial communities in the samples collected from 2 and 5 months following the fire clustered separately from those collected 13 and 17 months post-fire in two-dimensional space, indicating that the soil bacterial community structure changed with time following the fire. Deeper evaluation of the bacterial, archaeal, and fungal community patterns revealed that even though there were common bands between the unburned and the severely burned samples, the community structure of the samples from the unburned site grouped separately from those of the severely burned sites collected 2, 13, and 25 months post-fire. Generally, the microbial community composition in the unburned samples did not change significantly over two years. These data support the hypothesis that the soil microbial community was selected by both the direct and indirect effects associated with the wildfire in the initial two years after the perturbation. Rather than return to the predisturbance state, the soil microbial communities may reflect an alternate state two years following the fire.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Environmental Sciences
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3736
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xvi, 174 p. : ill., maps
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Robyn Ann Mikita
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Soil microbiology--New Jersey--Pine Barrens
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Wildfires--New Jersey--Pine Barrens
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000064149
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3R210DC
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Mikita
GivenName
Robyn
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2011-12-16 14:29:54
AssociatedEntity
Name
Robyn Mikita
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-01-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after January 30th, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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