Staff View
Appropriate plant genotypes for urban ecological restoration

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Appropriate plant genotypes for urban ecological restoration
SubTitle
an investigation into urban stress response
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Norin
NamePart (type = given)
Carolyn Susan
NamePart (type = date)
1977-
DisplayForm
Carolyn Norin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Handel
NamePart (type = given)
Steven N
DisplayForm
Steven N Handel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Smouse
NamePart (type = given)
Peter E
DisplayForm
Peter E Smouse
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Holzapfel
NamePart (type = given)
Claus
DisplayForm
Claus Holzapfel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sultan
NamePart (type = given)
Sonia E
DisplayForm
Sonia E Sultan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Given the unprecedented increase in urbanization and its effect on natural ecosystems, the effort to restore human-impacted land is timely and essential. Flexible and stress-resistant plant genotypes may provide a practical solution for restoration of constantly changing and stressful environments, yet there has been little progress linking general stress tolerance with plants being used in urban restoration. This dissertation project uses a novel, experimental approach to test and determine the importance and effectiveness of phenotypically plastic and stress-resistant plant genotypes in the ecological restoration of urban and degraded land. Using a model system involving the annual cress, Arabidopsis thaliana and the heat-shock protein (HSP) induced stress response system; I began this dissertation by testing if the presence of an induced stress response (HSP17.6) was essential for overall success. I found that mutant plants lacking a working HSP17.6 response generally showed an inability to cope with various types of abiotic urban stress. This difference was generally more pronounced in high stress conditions, providing evidence of adaptive plasticity. I then expanded the investigation by using six field-collected Arabidopsis genotypes and by adding a molecular analysis of the expression of both HSP17.6 and HSP101. I tested for natural variation in stress response, and then sought to use that information to predict success in various stressful conditions. While I found natural variation both in phenotype and the expression of HSP genes in stress, I saw little correlation between HSP expression and fitness, suggesting that predicting plant success via such molecular data may have limited utility. I did, however, identify “stress-resistant” genotypes, which consistently performed best across all stress treatments. Finally, I tested whether those stress-resistant genotypes continued to exhibit success in novel stress conditions. They did, which suggests that simple preliminary stress tests can provide a reasonable and quick method of genotype selection, especially for practitioners restoring urban and degraded land. I conclude that stress-resistant genotypes may be the best option when planting in heterogeneous soils with unknown stressor combinations in novel urban restoration sites.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Urban ecology (Sociology)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3720
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xvi, 180 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Carolyn Susan Norin
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Restoration ecology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Plants--Effect of stress on--Genetic aspects
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000064155
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3T152N4
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Norin
GivenName
Carolyn
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2011-12-06 15:13:51
AssociatedEntity
Name
Carolyn Norin
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
5775360
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
0464e3def723740e23a5577bef243d63f49e1535
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
ContentModel
ETD
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022