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Differential representation of drug-seeking within ventral pallidal subregions

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TitleInfo
Title
Differential representation of drug-seeking within ventral pallidal subregions
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Root
NamePart (type = given)
David Hamilton
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
David Root
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
West
NamePart (type = given)
Mark O
DisplayForm
Mark O West
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Torres
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth B
DisplayForm
Elizabeth B Torres
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kusnecov
NamePart (type = given)
Alexander
DisplayForm
Alexander Kusnecov
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zaborszky
NamePart (type = given)
Laszlo
DisplayForm
Laszlo Zaborszky
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-01
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Ventral pallidum (VP) neurons exhibit changes in firing rate (FR) immediately prior to and/or following cocaine-reinforced responses. We first aimed to determine whether the changes in FR surrounding cocaine-seeking responses were coincident with behaviors such as approaching the manipulandum, responding on the manipulandum, and retreating away from the manipulandum. Second, we aimed to determine whether changes in FR during cocaine-seeking behaviors differed between VP subregions. Prior to recordings, animals exhibited both task and skill learning, replicating previous results using this operant. 171 single-units in the ventromedial VP (VPvm) and 48 in the dorsolateral VP (VPdl) were recorded in welltrained animals during cocaine self-administration. Baseline FR and waveform characteristics did not differ between subregions. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater absolute change in FR over VPvm neurons during approaches as well as approaches divided into cued and uncued conditions. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater absolute change in FR over the VPvm during responses as well as responses divided into those cued/reinforced and uncued/unreinforced conditions. VPdl neurons were more likely to exhibit a similar change in FR during approach and response than VPvm neurons. VPvm neurons were heterogeneous, changing FRs during approach or response alone, or both. No differences were found between subregions during retreat behavior. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater absolute change in FR over the VPvm for retreats in which the pump was activated prior to or during a retreat, but not for retreats when the pump was not activated. Given that VPdl neurons exhibited a greater change in FR than VPvm neurons during approach and response, VPdl may be involved in the expression of drug-seeking behaviors through projections to "motoric" regions such as subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra. Furthermore, because VPdl neurons were more likely to continue their change of FR from approach through response while VPvm were more selective (e.g., approach alone, response alone), it is suggested that cocaine-seeking behaviors are differentially represented within VP subregions. The VPvm projects primarily to the mediodorsal thalamus and ventral tegmental area. Heterogeneous firing patterns within the VPvm may be involved in maintaining a representation of behavioral characteristics or sequences of self-administration behaviors.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Sensory neurons--Research
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cocaine--Physiological effect
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neurobiology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3703
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Note
Supplementary File: Supplemental Movie 1
Extent
vii, 123 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by David Hamilton Root
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000064168
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3BZ653J
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Root
GivenName
David
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2011-11-11 13:20:40
AssociatedEntity
Name
David Root
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-01-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2012-08-01
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after August 1st, 2012.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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68887040
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application/x-tar
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