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How personal experience modulates the neural circuitry of memories of September 11

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TitleInfo
Title
How personal experience modulates the neural circuitry of memories of September 11
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore30125900001.Manuscript.000064254
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T37P8WRT
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
September 11 terrorist attacks, 2001
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Amygdala
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Flashbulb memory
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Functional MRI
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Emotion
TypeOfResource
Text
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007)
English
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Version of Record (VoR)
Abstract (type = abstract)
Brown and Kulik [Brown R, Kulik J (1977) Cognition 5:73–99] introduced the term “flashbulb memory” to describe the recall of shocking, consequential events such as hearing news of a presidential assassination. They proposed that the vivid detail of such memories results from the action of a unique neural mechanism. In the present study of personal recollections of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11) in New York City, we combine behavioral and brain imaging techniques, with two goals: (i) to explore the neural basis of such memories and (ii) to clarify the characteristics of the emotional events that may give rise to them. Three years after the terrorist attacks, participants were asked to retrieve memories of 9/11, as well as memories of personally selected control events from 2001. At the time of the attacks, some participants were in Downtown Manhattan, close to the World Trade Center; others were in Midtown, a few miles away. The Downtown participants exhibited selective activation of the amygdala as they recalled events from 9/11, but not while they recalled control events. This was not the case for the Midtown participants. Moreover, only the Downtown participants reported emotionally enhanced recollective experiences while recalling events from 9/11, as compared with control events. These results suggest that close personal experience may be critical in engaging the neural mechanisms that underlie the emotional modulation of memory and thus in producing the vivid recollections to which the term flashbulb memory is often applied.
Note (type = original version)
This is an electronic version of the article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(1):389-394, 2007. The published article is available at http://www.pnas.org/content/104/1/389.abstract
Note (type = funding)
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant MH62104 (to E.A.P.)and by The Beatrice and Samuel A. Seaver Foundation.
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sharot
NamePart (type = given)
Tali
Affiliation
New York University, New York
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Martorella
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth A.
Affiliation
New York University, New York
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Delgado
NamePart (type = given)
Mauricio R.
Affiliation
Psychology (Newark), Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Phelps
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth A.
Description
New York University, New York
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Psychology (Newark)
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Newark College of Arts and Sciences
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2007-01-02
Publisher
National Academy of Sciences of the USA
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Delgado, Mauricio
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30125900001
PhysicalDescription
Extent
6 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Grant award
Label
National Institute of Health Grant
Detail
This work wassupported by National Institutes of Health Grant MH62104 (to E.A.P.) and by The Beatrice and Samuel A. Seaver Foundation.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
National Institute of Health
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
The Beatrice and Samuel A. Seaver Foundation.
AssociatedObject
Type
Grant Number
Name
MH62104
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2007
AssociatedObject
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Name
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
104(1)
Reference (type = digital)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0609230103
Detail
389-394
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
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RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (type = corporate)
Name
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Role
Copyright holder
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Technical

ContentModel
Manuscript
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/pdf
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
286720
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
e98d3abb122a08a4f77a0a03efd7c6146adf623c
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