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Latino Employment and Residential Segregation in Metropolitan Labor Markets

Descriptive

Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Latino or Hispanic
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Residential Segregation
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Employment
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Metropolitan Labor Markets
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Racial Stratification
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Racial Inequality
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Discrimination in housing
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Employment (Economic theory)
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Race discrimination
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Segregation
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Hispanic Americans
Abstract (type = abstract)
The spatial configuration of minorities relative to Whites in a metropolitan area, or residential segregation, has been identified as a significant barrier to access to employment opportunities for racial/ethnic minorities, including Latinos, in metropolitan labor markets. Dominating the research are tests of place stratification models that focus on segregated ethnic enclaves or the mismatch between minority communities and employment opportunities. Both approaches focus on predominantly Latino neighborhoods and communities, but overlook their structural location and isolation in the broader metropolitan labor market. This study examines whether and to what extent structural characteristics of metropolitan labor markets in which Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans live and work shape their employment opportunities and whether or not these relationships vary across the three Latino native-origin groups. We utilize a unique dataset of the demographic, employment, educational, occupational, and industrial characteristics of the 95 largest US cities. The analyses feature both OLS regression to ascertain if varying levels of segregation across metropolitan areas in 2000 is associated with different levels of employment for Latinos, and a fixed-effects analysis to determine if changes in these structural factors between 1980 and 2000 within the same labor market affect the employment rates of Latinos in that metropolitan area. We find that segregation has a deleterious effect on Latino men’s employment; in cities where segregation is worse, their employment rates are lower, and as the cities that they live in became more segregated over the 20 year period of study, their employment rates decreased.
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
von Lockette
NamePart (type = given)
Niki T. Dickerson
Affiliation
School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR), Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Johnson
NamePart (type = given)
Jacqueline
Affiliation
Adelphi University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore30127700001.Manuscript.000064959
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30P0XDJ
Note (type = original version)
This is the final author's version of a paper that was accepted for publication and appears in a revised form, subsequent to editorial input, in the journal Du Bois Review. The final published version of the paper is available at: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7827408
Note
© 2010 W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research
Note (type = funding)
This research is supported by a Department of Housing and Urban Development grant awarded by the National Academy of Science.
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Latino Employment and Residential Segregation in Metropolitan Labor Markets
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
PhysicalDescription
Extent
61 p.
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
OriginInfo
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
DateIssued (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2010
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
von Lockette, Niki
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30127700001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2010
AssociatedObject
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Name
Du Bois Review
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
7(1)
Reference (type = digital)
http://dx.doi.org/10.10170S1742058X10000147
Detail
151-184
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsHolder (type = corporate)
Name
W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research
Role
Copyright holder
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Technical

ContentModel
Manuscript
MimeType (TYPE = file)
application/msword
MimeType (TYPE = container)
application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
614400
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
706a3cf9f8ab9c5905a0cd5eb1697fc7a87673c2
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