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A case study of the use of response to intervention in a public school district

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TitleInfo
Title
A case study of the use of response to intervention in a public school district
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Davidoff
NamePart (type = given)
Linda J.
NamePart (type = date)
1952-
DisplayForm
Linda Davidoff
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Vitello
NamePart (type = given)
Stanley J
DisplayForm
Stanley J Vitello
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boyle
NamePart (type = given)
Joseph R
DisplayForm
Joseph R Boyle
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lugg
NamePart (type = given)
Catherine A
DisplayForm
Catherine A Lugg
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-05
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The educational community has raised several concerns regarding the identification of students with disabilities. Growing numbers of students classified in the Specific Learning Disabilities (SLD) category have prompted much discussion. Available research on SLD classification raises issues regarding the traditional ability/achievement discrepancy model of identification as well as disproportional minority membership in special education. Operational suggestions for remediation of these problems are lacking. With the 2004 reauthorization of IDEA the law now allows the use of Response to Intervention (RTI) in determinations of SLD eligibility. Proponents of RTI claim that it has benefits for decreasing the incidence of special education classification, reducing minority overrepresentation in special education, and providing early identification and intervention for at-risk students. If advocates of the RTI design are correct in their assertions, research on its structure, implementation and benefits are necessary to inform future practice. This dissertation study examines the RTI process, stakeholder perceptions of RTI benefits and challenges, and gains made in reading for students receiving RTI interventions, within one public school district. This mixed-method, case study included a qualitative sample of 19 staff members serving on the district RTI team and two building RTI teams. Participants included six district administrators, three principals, three general education teachers, two special education teachers, two literacy specialists, two Child Study Team members, and one guidance counselor. Qualitative data collection consisted of individual interviews conducted with all participants, as well as a focus group for the purpose of member checking. Interview and focus group transcripts were coded and key themes were vi generated related to the RTI process, staff perceptions of RTI benefits and challenges, and RTI impact on SLD classification within the district. The quantitative sample consisted of records on thirty first, second and third grade students who received RTI interventions. Data were analyzed using Single Sample t-Tests, Independent Samples t- Tests, a Dependent Samples t-Test, and the Mann-Whitney U Test. Quantitative findings indicate that students receiving RTI interventions benefit from the additional support. In most cases, these students had statistically significant mean beginning scores below same grade peers. Their mean gains with RTI interventions were sufficient to produce mean ending scores statistically insignificant in difference from ending benchmarks for their grade. As RTI / multi-tiered intervention models are implemented across the country, this study offers additional data regarding quantitative gains made by struggling students, as well as staff perceptions of the benefits and challenges of RTI as the process functions in one public school district. This data adds to literature in the field and may be assistive to other districts as they draft frameworks for RTI / multi-tiered intervention systems in the future.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Special Education
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_3864
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xii, 159 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Linda J. Davidoff
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Learning disabled children--Identification
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Response to intervention (Learning disabled children)--United States--Case studies
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = corporate)
United States.--Individuals with Disabilities Education Act
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Special education--United States--Case studies
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001500001.ETD.000064996
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TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3R49PQD
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Davidoff
GivenName
Linda
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-04-01 20:48:32
AssociatedEntity
Name
Linda Davidoff
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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