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Alternative inversion strategies to resistivity data for targets with sharp boundaries

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TitleInfo
Title
Alternative inversion strategies to resistivity data for targets with sharp boundaries
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Elwaseif
NamePart (type = given)
Mehrez H.
DisplayForm
Mehrez Elwaseif
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Slater
NamePart (type = given)
Lee D
DisplayForm
Lee D Slater
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Keating
NamePart (type = given)
Kristina
DisplayForm
Kristina Keating
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ntarlagiannis
NamePart (type = given)
Dimitrios
DisplayForm
Dimitrios Ntarlagiannis
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nyquist
NamePart (type = given)
Jonathan
DisplayForm
Jonathan Nyquist
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-05
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Estimating the geometry and resistivity of archeological structures using resistivity models produced as a result of applying smoothness constraints in most inversion algorithms is difficult, especially when structures are closely spaced. However, such quantification is important to facilitate conservation and to minimize the potential of damage when excavations are undertaken. Alternative inversion approaches more appropriate for imaging such targets require either a priori information about the subsurface (e.g. disconnected inversion) or require two or more geophysical datasets to be collected at the same site (e.g. joint inversion). The research outlined in this dissertation presents three novel approaches to improve resistivity imaging of discrete targets without the need to incorporate a priori information in the inversion. The first approach combines an initial 2D smoothness constraint inversion coupled with a digital image processing technique known as a watershed algorithms and a second inversion step incorporating a disconnect in the regularization based on the output of the watershed algorithm. This approach has improved estimate of the geometries of individual targets, but it was not very effective at predicting the resistivity of the targets or resolving closely spaced targets. The second approach combines an initial 2D smoothness constraint inversion coupled with the watershed algorithm and a trained Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Although this approach has been proven effective for resolving widely and closely spaced archeological targets, the results depend largely on the quality of ANN training and on the accuracy of the watershed algorithm geometry prediction. Finally, the third strategy is an iterative approach that combines an initial 3D smoothness constraint inversion that is used only at the first iteration to recover a resistivity model that is fairly consistent with the measured data, from which an initial target location is estimated using an edge detector method and from which a disconnect in the inversion is identified. The disconnect defining the target outline is then progressively improved following each iteration of the inverse procedure. This approach has been proven more effective for resolving widely and closely spaced archeological targets over other approaches, but it is partially sensitive to artifacts in the initial smoothness constraint model.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Environmental Science
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4063
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xiv, 136 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph. D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Mehrez H. Elwaseif
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Geophysics
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Archaeological assemblages
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000065030
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38914TG
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Elwaseif
GivenName
Mehrez
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-04-30 23:51:55
AssociatedEntity
Name
Mehrez Elwaseif
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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