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Cholinergic-GABAergic circuits in the neostriatum

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TitleInfo
Title
Cholinergic-GABAergic circuits in the neostriatum
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
English
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel F.
NamePart (type = date)
1983-
DisplayForm
Daniel english
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Abercrombie
NamePart (type = given)
Elizabeth D
DisplayForm
Elizabeth D Abercrombie
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Koos
NamePart (type = given)
Tibor
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Tibor Koos
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Tepper
NamePart (type = given)
James
DisplayForm
James Tepper
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Creese
NamePart (type = given)
Ian
DisplayForm
Ian Creese
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pare
NamePart (type = given)
Denis
DisplayForm
Denis Pare
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wilson
NamePart (type = given)
Charles J
DisplayForm
Charles J Wilson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-05
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The basal ganglia are a system of subcortical nuclei whose functions include regulating the motivation for voluntary actions. One key aspect of this function is to assist in action selection, often referred to popularly as decision making, by keeping track of past results and utilizing this information to produce ideal decisions and by signaling the motivational significance of environmental events. Two types of basal ganglia neurons have been most extensively studied in terms of their role in these functions: the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta and the tonically active cholinergic interneurons of the neostriatum. Both have stereotypic responses to motivationally salient stimuli, and it is assumed that this information is used in choosing the most beneficial response. The focus of my thesis work was to investigate how the responses of neostriatal cholinergic interneurons to motivationally salient stimuli (commonly termed the pause response) are translated into downstream effects in projection neurons. My underlying hypothesis was that if these signals are to participate in the translation of a temporally brief and important environmental event into changes in behavior, that there must be a fast and temporally precise effect on the projection neuron output to other brain structures. Although striatal projection neurons express receptors for acetylcholine, they are of the slow acting muscarinic type, not the fast acting nicotinic type. Therefore, fast cholinergic regulation of projection neurons is assumed to be mediated by changes in synaptic input. We utilized technologies including optogenetics, transgenic mice and molecular biology to experimentally recapitulate the pause response of cholinergic interneurons in acute murine brain slice preparations, which preserve much of the intrinsic neostriatal circuitry, as well in behaving mice. We were then able to simultaneously record neostriatal neurons using in vitro whole-cell intracellular and in vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings. These experiments revealed a novel neostriatal cholinergic-GABAergic circuit involving a recently described GABAergic interneuron similar to cortical neurogliaform GABAergic interneurons, which translate the pause response of cholinergic interneurons into fast and powerful inhibition of projection neurons. In addition to uncovering an unknown and unpredicted mechanism of action of acetylcholine in the neostriatum, these results demonstrate the power of combining traditional electrophysiological recording methods with current optogenetic, transgenic
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Behavioral and Neural Sciences
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Basal ganglia
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neostriatum
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Identifier
ETD_4076
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000065031
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
ix, 141 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniel F. English
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3D50KW7
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
english
GivenName
Daniel
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-05-01 16:08:48
AssociatedEntity
Name
Daniel english
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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