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Transcript of Immigration Inspector Lewis B. Reynolds’s first interrogation with Hom Jin Fung [page 2 of 2]

Descriptive

Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
Subject
Name (authority = lcsh)
NamePart (type = personal)
Fung, Hom Jin
Note (type = source note)
Hom Jin Fung (Box 336, Case 104, 60); Chinese exclusion acts case files, 1880-1960; Immigration and Naturalization Service, Record Group 85; National Archives and Records Administration – Northeast Region (New York).
Note
The interrogation took place on February 5, 1926. It was transcribed and signed by the Immigrant inspector and Acting Stenographer on February 6, 1926. It was translated and read to Hom Jin Fung who signed in Chinese on February 11, 1926.
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Digital exhibition
Label
Chinese Exclusion in New Jersey: Immigration Law in the Past and Present
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2012
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Urban, Andy
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Capone, Kim
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Gunther, Rudy
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Hassanein. Shereen
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Mitwally, Hoda
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition section
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Hom Jin Fung
Detail
Hom Jin Fung left Sam Ah Hong village in China’s Hoy Ping District in the 1910s. He worked as a carpenter on an Indian vessel for about three years prior to entering the United States. After entering the United States, Hom opened Wing Lee Laundry in Bayonne, NJ. In November 1925, the United States Customs Service received an anonymous letter stating that Hom was working at Wing Lee Laundry without proper identification. Lewis B. Reynolds, an immigration inspector, and an unnamed bilingual translator, interrogated Hom. Like other detainees thought to be in violation of the Chinese Exclusion Act, he was questioned very thoroughly. Reynolds asked questions involving Hom’s immigration history, past work, family, and current employment at the laundry. Hom stated that he had a wife who resided in his native village and that they had no children. Later, he contradicted himself by admitting that he had a son in China with his wife.

When asked for proper documentation allowing him to live and work in the United States, Hom claimed it was accidentally burnt at the laundry. A second interrogation was held a few days later, during which the authorities found inconsistencies with Hom’s previously given statements. For instance, he admitted that he did not possess the appropriate paperwork that would allow him to live and work in the United States. Based on the interrogations and anonymous letter, Reynolds decided that deportation was necessary. In February 1926, the United States Commissioner for the District of New Jersey charged Hom as a “Chinese alien laborer unlawfully [residing] within the United States.” The Commissioner called for his immediate detainment and deportation, even though he lacked legal representation and a trial had not yet been held.

Hom’s case was heard upon appeal in the United States District Court in Trenton, although it took nearly a year for the case to appear before the judge. Immigration officials like Reynolds did not want Hom Jin Fung’s deportation decision to go to court because many Chinese immigrants exhausted the legal system attempting to appeal their exclusion decision. The success rate for appealing an exclusion decision with legal representation was high, even though this was not the case with Hom. Chinese immigrants were very knowledgeable about the laws and requirements for entrance into the United States. Many immigrants hired lawyers to assist entry or reentry into the United States. Lawyers and lobbyists were valuable allies for Chinese immigrants. Generally, immigration officials more readily believed rumors over testimony from immigrants (such as that in the anonymous letter), making their cases before immigration officials outside the legal system difficult. The relatively new immigration policies at the time, combined with racialized perceptions of Chinese immigrants, allowed for corruption within the system. On April 30, 1927, Hom was deported to the Republic of China via California.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Transcript of Immigration Inspector Lewis B. Reynolds’s first interrogation with Hom Jin Fung [page 2 of 2]
Detail
Transcript of Immigration Inspector Lewis B. Reynolds’s first interrogation with Hom Jin Fung at the Wing Lee Laundry in Bayonne, NJ. Chinese immigrants suspect to be in violation of the Chinese Exclusion Act were subject to similar interrogation questions and methods as Hom.
AssociatedObject
Type
Placement in digital exhibition
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
25
TypeOfResource
StillImage
TitleInfo
Title
Transcript of Immigration Inspector Lewis B. Reynolds’s first interrogation with Hom Jin Fung [page 2 of 2]
Genre (authority = AAT)
forms (documents)
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Chinese Exclusion Act (1882)
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Chinese Americans
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Immigrants
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
United States--Emigration and immigration
Subject
HierarchicalGeographic
Country
UNITED STATES
State
New Jersey
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
image/x-djvu
InternetMediaType
image/jpeg
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fung
NamePart (type = given)
Hom Jin
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrelator); (type = text)
Applicant
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
1926-02-05
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore00000002171.Document.000065322
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Chinese Exclusion in New Jersey: Immigration Law in the Past and Present
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002171
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3PN94KJ
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = RU_Archives); (ID = RU_Archives_v2)
The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code) governs use of this work. You may make use of this resource, with proper attribution, in accordance with U.S. copyright law.
Copyright
Status
Public domain
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
US federal document
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Source

SourceTechnical
SourceType
Text or graphic (paper)
Extent (Unit = page(s))
1
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Technical

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MimeType (TYPE = file)
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application/x-tar
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