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Physical skill learning increases neurogenesis through cell survival in the hippocampus

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TitleInfo
Title
Physical skill learning increases neurogenesis through cell survival in the hippocampus
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Curlik,
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
NamePart (type = date)
1985-
DisplayForm
Daniel Curlik, II
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shors
NamePart (type = given)
Tracey J
DisplayForm
Tracey J Shors
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Matzel
NamePart (type = given)
Louis
DisplayForm
Louis Matzel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Otto
NamePart (type = given)
Timothy
DisplayForm
Timothy Otto
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Alderman
NamePart (type = given)
Brandon
DisplayForm
Brandon Alderman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-10
CopyrightDate (qualifier = exact)
2012
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The dentate gyrus is a major site of plasticity in the adult brain, giving rise to thousands of new neurons every day. While the majority of these cells die within two weeks of their birth, they can be rescued from death by various forms of learning. The successful acquisition of select types of associative and spatial memories can increase the number of these cells that survive. Here, we investigated the possibility that an entirely different form of learning, physical skill learning, could rescue these new neurons from death. To test this possibility, rats were trained with a physically-demanding and technically-difficult version of a rotarod procedure. Acquisition of the physical skill greatly increased the number of new hippocampal cells that survived. The number of surviving cells positively correlated with performance on the task. Only animals that successfully learned the task retained the cells that would have otherwise died. Animals that failed to learn, and those that did not learn well, did not retain any more cells than those that were untrained. Importantly, acute voluntary exercise in activity wheels did not increase the number of surviving cells. These data indicate that skill learning, and not physical activity per se, increased the number of surviving cells. Moreover, learning an easier version of the task did not increase cell survival. These data are consistent with previous studies revealing that learning rescues new neurons from death, but only when acquisition is sufficiently difficult to achieve. Finally, complete hippocampal lesions did not disrupt acquisition of this physical skill. Therefore, learning this motor skill task does not depend on the hippocampus, even though it can increase the number of surviving cells in the structure. These data, and their implications, suggest that humans who learn new and complicated sports or other physical skills will retain more new neurons than humans that do not engage in effortful activities.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4333
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
viii, 122 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniel M. Curlik II
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Developmental neurobiology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hippocampus (Brain)
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066663
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3WW7GFD
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Curlik, II
GivenName
Daniel
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-09-30 12:14:30
AssociatedEntity
Name
Daniel Curlik, II
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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