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Salt solid dispersions

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Salt solid dispersions
SubTitle
a formulation strategy to enhance dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble ionic drugs
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ghosh
NamePart (type = given)
Anasuya A.
NamePart (type = date)
1976-
DisplayForm
Anasuya Ghosh
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Minko
NamePart (type = given)
Tamara
DisplayForm
Tamara Minko
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Michniak-Kohn
NamePart (type = given)
Bozena B
DisplayForm
Bozena B Michniak-Kohn
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
You
NamePart (type = given)
Guofeng
DisplayForm
Guofeng You
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zannou
NamePart (type = given)
Erika
DisplayForm
Erika Zannou
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Improving oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs remains one of the most challenging aspects of drug development. Pharmaceutical salt formation is a widely accepted approach to improve dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble ionic drugs. Nevertheless, the salt formation process is often empirical and may not always lead to desired end product profile. Alternatively, pH-modifiers have been used as formulation components for such compounds. The purpose of this study is to explore the synergies between pH modulating ability offered by a salt form and the dissolution enhancement offered by an amorphous solid dispersion. The hypothesis of this study is that for a weakly basic drug, its solid dispersion with a hydrophilic polymer and a salt-forming acidic counterion should provide dissolution enhancement similar to that of a solid dispersion of its salt. Secondly, for a weakly basic drug if a salt form with a selected counterion cannot be synthesized, then solid dispersion of the drug, the non-salt forming counterion and a hydrophilic polymer could also provide adequate dissolution enhancement. In the present investigation the dissolution enhancement of Cinnarizine, a weakly basic drug, is studied from its solid dispersions containing acidic counterions (organic acids) that have varying ability to form cinnarizine salts. The effect of adding ionic polymers as pH-modifiers is also investigated. Solid dispersions were prepared using melt extrusion technology. Molecular interactions between relevant functional groups of drug and pH-modifiers and the possibility of in situ salt formation during the melt extrusion process were explored. The results of this study systematically offer the benefits of adding acidic counterions during melt extrusion, should a classical salt formation technique fail. A predictive computational model was used to estimate human in vivo plasma profiles by using in vitro dissolution of the developed solid dispersions and the marketed product.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Pharmaceutical Science
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4341
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xviii, 151 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Anasuya A. Ghosh
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Drugs--Solubility
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Drugs--Solubility--Testing
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000066746
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3QF8RP6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Ghosh
GivenName
Anasuya
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-10-01 11:33:14
AssociatedEntity
Name
Anasuya Ghosh
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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2767872
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application/x-tar
FileSize (UNIT = bytes)
2775040
Checksum (METHOD = SHA1)
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