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An analysis of electrohydrodynamic stability and deformation in immiscible fluids

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TitleInfo
Title
An analysis of electrohydrodynamic stability and deformation in immiscible fluids
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zhang
NamePart (type = given)
Jia
NamePart (type = date)
1984-
DisplayForm
Jia Zhang
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lin
NamePart (type = given)
Hao
DisplayForm
Hao Lin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Knight
NamePart (type = given)
Doyle
DisplayForm
Doyle Knight
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rossmann
NamePart (type = given)
Tobias
DisplayForm
Tobias Rossmann
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yang
NamePart (type = given)
Yuan-Nan
DisplayForm
Yuan-Nan Yang
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2012
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2012-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The interactions between an electric field and fluid motion give rise to a class of complex and important phenomena known as electrohydrodynamics. In this work, we developed a set of analytical tools to provide basic understanding and quantitative prediction capabilities. Under this theme, three tasks have been accomplished. 1. A general solution approach for the electrohydrodynamic instability of stratified immiscible fluids is presented. The problems of two and three fluid layers subject to normal electric fields are analyzed. Analytical solutions are obtained by employing the transfer relations relating the disturbance stresses to the flow variables at the interface(s). The results assume a general format. Both new dispersion relations and those from various previous work are shown to be special cases when proper simplifications are considered. As a specific example, the stability behavior of a three-layer channel flow is investigated in details using this framework. This work provides a unifying method to treat a generic class of instability problems. 2. A transient analysis to quantify droplet deformation under DC electric fields is presented. The full Taylor-Melcher leaky dielectric model is employed where the charge relaxation time is considered to be finite. The droplet is assumed to be spheroidal in shape for all times. The main result is an ODE governing the evolution of the droplet aspect ratio. The model is validated by extensively comparing predicted deformation with both previous theoretical and numerical studies, and with experimental data. Furthermore, the effects of parameters and stresses on deformation characteristics are systematically analyzed taking advantage of the explicit formulae on their contributions. The theoretical framework lays the foundation for the study of a more complex problem, vesicle electrodeformation. 3. A transient analysis for vesicle deformation under DC electric fields is developed. The theory extends from a droplet model, with the additional consideration of a lipid membrane separating two fluids of arbitrary properties. For the latter, both a membrane-charging and a membrane-mechanical model are supplied. The main result is also an ODE governing the evolution of the vesicle aspect ratio. The effects of initial membrane tension and pulse length are examined. The model prediction is extensively compared with experimental data, and is shown to accurately capture the system behavior in the regime of no or weak electroporation. More importantly, the comparison reveals that vesicle relaxation obeys a universal behavior regardless of the means of deformation. The process is governed by a single timescale that is a function of the vesicle initial radius, the fluid viscosity, and the initial membrane tension. This universal scaling law can be used to calculate membrane properties from experimental data. Together, these projects provide powerful tools to analyze a broad class of problems involving electrostatics, hydrodynamics, and membrane mechanics.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4177
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xii, 82 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jia Zhang
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Electrohydrodynamics
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000067034
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31C1VM0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Zhang
GivenName
Jia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-07-24 17:37:45
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jia Zhang
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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