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Developing an observational coding system on racial issues for black-white couples

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TitleInfo
Title
Developing an observational coding system on racial issues for black-white couples
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Scott
NamePart (type = given)
Alycia C.
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
Alycia Scott
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kelly
NamePart (type = given)
Shalonda
DisplayForm
Shalonda Kelly
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fagley
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy S.
DisplayForm
Nancy S. Fagley
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Interracial marriages are increasing steadily in the United States, and Black-White interracial couples have a unique experience as compared with other interracial pairings. Black-White couples experience more stressors (discrimination, lack of support from friends and family) and also may exhibit more protective factors (partner acceptance, strong coping skills) in their relationships, both of which impact the quality of the romantic relationship (Foeman & Nance, 2002). Due to the biases that exist in self-report measures on couple satisfaction and relationship quality (Paulhus, 1989, 1990), this study sought to develop a reliable observational coding system to objectively measure how Black-White couples discuss and cope together with issues surrounding race and racial difference. Successive Cohort Design (Epstein et al., 2007) was utilized due to the hypothesis that this design would allow for the coding system to be improved mid-study, ultimately resulting in a more relevant and reliable coding system. Participating couples (n=9) were divided into three cohorts. After three codebook iterations, one code out of 21 (Social Support-Positive) was consistently reliable across all cohorts, and six other codes (Discrimination, Social Support-Negative, Coping-Passive, Increased Racial Awareness, Stress, Partner Positivity) achieved slightly low-to-good reliability in two of three cohorts. Code frequency data corroborate previous research identifying salient themes for Black-White interracial couples. Lack of social support was common, as was higher frequency of negative racial identity. The couples studied also employed passive coping strategies three times more often than active strategies, consistent with previous findings (Foeman and Nance, 2002). Due to several limitations of the current study (small n, inadequate training time, overlap of coders across cohorts), it is recommended that the final codebook of this study be applied to a larger sample with newly trained coders to assess sufficiently the reliability of the overall coding system. Future research that assesses how codes derived from this coding system correlate with relationship satisfaction measures can further inform couples’ treatment.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4416
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 129 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Alycia C. Scott
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Coding theory
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Interracial marriage
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Stress (Psychology)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
African Americans--Marriage
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Whites--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Man-woman relationships
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001800001.ETD.000067520
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3HD7TDV
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Scott
GivenName
Alycia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2012-12-12 14:45:07
AssociatedEntity
Name
Alycia Scott
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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