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Secret diplomacy

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TitleInfo
Title
Secret diplomacy
SubTitle
the practice of back channel diplomacy by liberal democratic states
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Momengoh
NamePart (type = given)
Nick Parfait
DisplayForm
Nick Momengoh
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Langhorne
NamePart (type = given)
Richard
DisplayForm
Richard Langhorne
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Carruthers
NamePart (type = given)
Susan
DisplayForm
Susan Carruthers
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Seiglie
NamePart (type = given)
Carlos
DisplayForm
Carlos Seiglie
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fischer
NamePart (type = given)
Frank
DisplayForm
Frank Fischer
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
In January 1919, in the Paris Peace Conference, US President Woodrow Wilson stated that diplomacy ought to be: “Open covenants of peace, openly arrived at, after which there shall be no private international understandings of any kind but diplomacy shall proceed always frankly and in the public view.” Due to the idea that diplomatic and foreign policy intrigues had led to the Great War of 1914-18, the call for transparency seemed the ultimate solution. Since then, secret diplomacy has been the object of controversy and a contradiction to the principles of liberal democracy. As the title indicates, this dissertation will focus on the practice of secret diplomacy by liberal democracies. This is a practice that has been condemned, and this dissertation is designed to use illustrations and analysis of secret diplomatic documents in order to investigate the following questions. Do liberal democracies still practice secret diplomacy? And, if they do, is such a practice justified in a democracy? Why is secret diplomacy still an object of debate for democracies? And, can secret diplomacy survive in this Information Age? Most of the illustrations will be drawn from two Western liberal democracies: France and the United States. The main challenge facing an academic researcher in studying secret diplomacy is the fact that a lot of diplomatic documents are not necessarily available or classified. Facing this challenge, this study will investigate how much evidence can be found by exploring the released documents and diplomatic archives. The significance of this study is two-fold. First, the plan is to redefine the concept of secret diplomacy within the parameters of international relations. It is important for the understanding of international relations and global governance to explore the practice of secret diplomacy. Then, the study will explore secret diplomatic cases from different point in time to provide the answers to the above questions. Another value of this investigation is based on the fact that the analysis brings Anglo/American/French studies into one place, and provides evidence to fill the gaps in the official story of those events. One needs to understand that open diplomacy only represents the “tip of the diplomatic iceberg.” The other side of the diplomatic iceberg is beneath the surface and under the “waters of international relations.”
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Global Affairs
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4845
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 258 p.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Nick Parfait Momengoh
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Diplomacy
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
United States--Foreign relations
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
France--Foreign relations
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Transparency in government--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Transparency in government--France
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10002600001.ETD.000068737
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38914G0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Momengoh
GivenName
Nick
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-05-10 16:36:37
AssociatedEntity
Name
Nick Momengoh
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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