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The impact of animal rights on wildlife conservation and management in Kenya

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TitleInfo
Title
The impact of animal rights on wildlife conservation and management in Kenya
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Capoccia
NamePart (type = given)
Regina
DisplayForm
Regina Capoccia
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Schroeder
NamePart (type = given)
Richard A
DisplayForm
Richard A Schroeder
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hughes
NamePart (type = given)
David M
DisplayForm
David M Hughes
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McCay
NamePart (type = given)
Bonnie
DisplayForm
Bonnie McCay
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ehrenfeld
NamePart (type = given)
David
DisplayForm
David Ehrenfeld
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation explains the role of the animal rights movement in Kenya’s wildlife conservation and management. The research proposes that animal rights principles are a major driver in the formation of Kenya’s wildlife policy and management protocol. The dissertation begins with a discussion on the animal rights agenda and how this overlaps with Kenya’s wildlife management policies in a way that places Kenya on the international stage as one of Africa’s leaders in wildlife conservation. The second and third chapters address the history of the animal rights movement and the history of wildlife conservation in Kenya with a categorical analysis of the non-government wildlife organizations active in the country. Over the last few centuries, the animal rights movement gained momentum and expanded from animals in captive settings to animals in non-captive settings. The question in reference to animals’ condition: “can they suffer?” posited by Jeremy Bentham in 1781, remains at the core of the movement. Initially applied to animal-use scenarios such as medical testing, the concept of suffering has expanded to address sustainable and traditional hunting practices, habitat loss, and even predator-prey relationships. Kenya’s colonial wildlife management relied on concepts of suffering and cruelty to develop early hunting and land access laws. Policies in recent decades expanded on the idea that Kenya’s wildlife was in danger of extinction and initiated policies that banned hunting and promoted the care of individual animals. In the 1989, Kenya was recognized for taking a lead role in the ban on ivory, a move that branded the country as a vanguard in the protection of wildlife. The fourth and fifth chapters use case studies and an analysis of NGO activities to show how animal rights principles unfold in wildlife conservation protocol and in the strategies and tactics of organizations that focus on wildlife protection. Profiles of areas including Meru National Park, and the greater Tsavo region show the geography of the animal rights movement in everything from park creation to regional management. These case studies are followed by a set of management scenarios and organizational practices that embody animal rights principles. By focusing on specific trends in management protocols and organizational strategies, this work highlights the impacts of the animal rights movement in action. The dissertation concludes by drawing on Kenya’s unique characteristics from a regional geography perspective and calls into question the future of Kenya’s wildlife without the active movement.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geography
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4663
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 229 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Stella Capoccia
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Wildlife conservation--Kenya
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Animal rights movement--Kenya
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068824
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T36M35F6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Capoccia
GivenName
Regina
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-04-12 16:30:39
AssociatedEntity
Name
Regina Capoccia
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2013-11-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2013.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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