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Towards a networked public sphere

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TitleInfo
Title
Towards a networked public sphere
SubTitle
how social media triggers civic engagement through news consumption and political discussion
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Halpern
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
DisplayForm
Daniel Halpern
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Katz
NamePart (type = given)
James E
DisplayForm
James E Katz
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gibbs
NamePart (type = given)
Jennifer
DisplayForm
Jennifer Gibbs
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Weber
NamePart (type = given)
Matthew
DisplayForm
Matthew Weber
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Campbell
NamePart (type = given)
Scott
DisplayForm
Scott Campbell
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation studies the affordances of Social Network Sites (SNSs) that appear to amplify the participatory effects of news information and political talk on civic engagement. It also advances a theoretical model that might account for these amplifying effects. More particularly, due to SNSs’ underlying properties that make the structure of political discussion more translucent, and that motivate media information seeking by contacts’ notifications, I argue that this participatory dynamic has a positive effect on collective efficacy ( a personal-psychological mediator traditionally associated with civic engagement). Drawing on the O-S-R-O-R (orientations-stimulus-reasoning-orientations-response) model of communication effects and following a network perspective, I suggest that the ways SNSs facilitate access to news information and promote political discussion through integration of peer generated information, affect how people engage with others and process information. This, in turn, affects the traditional mediation of news consumption and political discussion on civic engagement. To test the relationships between the variables identified in the proposed model, I rely on data collected from a survey of college students (N = 808). Results indicate that whereas political discussion originated in SNSs has a stronger effect on civic participation compared to face-to-face and Email conversation, collective efficacy partially mediates the association between interpersonal discussion and civic engagement. Concerning structural features in which political discussion occurs, it was found that network heterogeneity and discussion among weak ties moderate positively the effects on civic engagement. Further, the positive effect of news consumption and political discussion on civic engagement was found even in non-active information seekers and those exposed serendipitously to information. To test in an experimental setting whether participation in SNSs, in the form of discussion about civic-related issues, has an impact on political collective efficacy, 151 students participated commenting on Facebook and YouTube accounts of the White House and other federal agencies during a two-week interval. The experiment confirmed that discussion in social media served as a catalyst for collective efficacy. This positive relationship was found to be stronger in Facebook than in YouTube, supporting the view that the formation of a networked public sphere is strongly affected by the type of audiences (contacts) in users’ networks.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social media--Political aspects
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4511
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xi, 200 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Daniel Halpern
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Social ethics
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068871
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T31G0JWH
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Halpern
GivenName
Daniel
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-04-15 16:35:39
AssociatedEntity
Name
Daniel Halpern
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2013-11-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2013.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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