Staff View
Carbon nanotube composite scaffolds for differentiation of human neural stem cells

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Carbon nanotube composite scaffolds for differentiation of human neural stem cells
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Heden
NamePart (type = given)
Gregory
DisplayForm
Gregory Heden
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Neimark
NamePart (type = given)
Alexander V
DisplayForm
Alexander V Neimark
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Moghe
NamePart (type = given)
Prabhas
DisplayForm
Prabhas Moghe
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Asefa
NamePart (type = given)
Tewodros
DisplayForm
Tewodros Asefa
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Carbon nanotubes have been utilized in a variety of fields due to their unique and extraordinary properties. Here, a process to incorporate single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into electrospun polymer mats is investigated in order to create novel composite scaffolds to enhance the differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into fully developed neurons. An electrowetting method is first explored using a potential difference as a driving force. Although successful wetting was achieved, a vacuum impregnation method was used to further improve the uniformity of the SWNT distribution in the scaffold. This process produced homogenously wetted scaffolds that are electrically conductive, mechanically robust, and highly biocompatible with hNSC cultures in vitro. These scaffolds showed an increased expression of two major neuronal markers, Neurofilament M (NFM) and microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2) compared to plain electrospun polymer scaffolds. During differentiation tests, an additional electrical stimulation was applied and showed even further enhancement. This is the first demonstration of electrical stimulation enhancing neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells on CNT-based composite scaffolds.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4714
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
v, 29 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Gregory Heden
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Neural stem cells
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nanotubes
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Nanomedicine
Identifier (type = hdl)
http://hdl.rutgers.edu/1782.1/rucore10001600001.ETD.000068878
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3XP73H0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Heden
GivenName
Gregory
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-04-15 15:36:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
Gregory Heden
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.4.8
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2022