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An investigation of early response as a mediator in group psychotherapy for women with post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders

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TitleInfo
Title
An investigation of early response as a mediator in group psychotherapy for women with post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorders
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sawaya
NamePart (type = given)
Jennifer Ann
NamePart (type = date)
1980-
DisplayForm
Jennifer Sawaya
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hien
NamePart (type = given)
Denise A.
DisplayForm
Denise A. Hien
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Langenbucher
NamePart (type = given)
James
DisplayForm
James Langenbucher
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hildebrandt
NamePart (type = given)
Thomas
DisplayForm
Thomas Hildebrandt
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The depression, substance abuse, and bulimia psychotherapy literature has demonstrated that symptom improvement within the first 4-8 weeks of treatment bears a predictive relationship with long-term outcomes and that this information can be used for treatment planning purposes. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which early response is related to therapeutic change. Theoretical arguments maintain that early improvement reflects the effects of nonspecific factors and may mediate the oft-observed relationship between common factors, such as therapeutic alliance, and post-treatment outcomes. Early response to psychotherapy has not been studied among individuals with PTSD. Utilizing data from the Clinical Trials Network - Women and Trauma Study, the present study assessed the predictive validity of early treatment response among 353 women diagnosed with PTSD and substance use disorders. Participants were randomized to receive 12 sessions of Seeking Safety group psychotherapy or Women’s Health Education over 6 weeks. It was hypothesized that early response mediated the relationship between helping alliance and subsequent trauma and substance abuse outcomes, and that subjects in Seeking Safety improved more rapidly. ROC curves were used to assess the validity of early response and to generate clinical cutoff values predicting an individual’s likelihood of non-response during follow-up. Latent growth curve methodology was utilized to test the proposed mediation model. While subjects demonstrated early improvement in trauma symptoms, there was no early improvement in substance abuse symptoms. Trauma symptom severity and cumulative abstinence at the fourth week of treatment predicted response status up to one year following treatment with a fair to excellent degree of accuracy. The rates of early improvement in trauma symptoms showed near-significant differences between the two treatment groups (p = .06), suggesting that trauma symptoms improved more quickly among subjects in Seeking Safety. Early symptom improvement was not found to be a viable mediator of helping alliance and outcomes. Results diverged from previous findings regarding early response to substance abuse treatment, which may be attributable to study limitations. The current study is unique in that it supports the predictive validity of early improvement in PTSD symptoms among women with comorbid PTSD and addiction.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4925
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
viii, 90 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jennifer Ann Sawaya
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women--Mental health services
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Post-traumatic stress disorder
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Traumatism
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women--Mental health
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mental illness—Treatment
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3Z0365N
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Sawaya
GivenName
Jennifer
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-07-26 09:44:41
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jennifer Sawaya
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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