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Differential circadian behaviors in aquatic annelids

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TitleInfo
Title
Differential circadian behaviors in aquatic annelids
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morrison
NamePart (type = given)
Kevin
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
DisplayForm
Kevin Morrison
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shain
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel
DisplayForm
Daniel Shain
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Saidel
NamePart (type = given)
William
DisplayForm
William Saidel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lee
NamePart (type = given)
Kwangwon
DisplayForm
Kwangwon Lee
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
In aquatic annelids, locomotion has proven to be a perplexing phenomenon because of the intricacies with which it is regulated. These animals are capable of either swimming or crawling (or both) depending on species. Studies of Erpobdella punctata, a temperate aquatic leech, have shown that each of these locomotion methods are differentially regulated according to an innate circadian rhythm. Swimming occurrences are regulated by an internal oscillator resulting in predictable circadian patterns while crawling is not, resulting in time-independent crawling outputs. The difference in these output pathways seems implausible, but could possibly be caused by each method of locomotion having independent output pathways from a circadian oscillator. In this study, an automated motion capture experiment was designed to quantitatively evaluate various species of aquatic annelids for circadian-regulated crawling rhythms. Erpobdella punctata was used as a positive control for circadian behavior, but the experimental design used was unable to differentiate between swimming and crawling. To isolate crawling behaviors, a phylogenetic approach was utilized by analyzing species closely related to E. punctata for comparison. Helobdella robusta and Mesenchytraeus solifugus - both of which are obligate crawling annelids - were tested for innate rhythms to determine whether lack of crawling regulation is found in other species as well. Simultaneously, attempts were made to isolate circadian oscillatory genes from each of the three species in question via the Polymerase Chain Reaction. Comparisons were made of known Drosophila melanogaster circadian regulatory genes clock, cycle, doubletime and cryptochrome with the Capitella teleta genome in an attempt to find annelid circadian sequences. Amplified annelid sequences successfully showed no sequence similarity to any known genes in NCBI archives, nor in the Capitella teleta genome. However, H. robusta and E. punctata showed measurable crawling rhythm with close to a 24 hour period (while M. solifugus did not), implying future probing would be required to rule out the existence of a molecular oscillator in these species. The activity study also implies that lack of crawling rhythm in E. punctata is either unique to the species, or that previous studies regarding this behavior are flawed.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5002
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vi, 31 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kevin Morrison
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Annelida--Locomotion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Circadian rhythms
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Annelida--Research
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3S75D9J
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Morrison
GivenName
Kevin
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-09-16 12:57:55
AssociatedEntity
Name
Kevin Morrison
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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