Staff View
The jazz widows

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
The jazz widows
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bradford
NamePart (type = given)
Melba Joyce
DisplayForm
Melba Bradford
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Porter
NamePart (type = given)
Lewis
DisplayForm
Lewis Porter
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Martin
NamePart (type = given)
Henry
DisplayForm
Henry Martin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
While women have played significant roles within the genre of jazz music, most have been celebrated as vocalists. However, the stories of women who supported their artist husbands in partnership have not, to my knowledge, been documented. My thesis, The Jazz Widows, documents the role of women who spent their lives with their husbands, jazz musicians, and their participation in the success of their husbands’ careers. This musical art form called jazz is the music created by the black man. This music is one of the most important in America, because it is indigenous, originating from another Africa, a musical genre called “the blues.” Just as Italian music was bought from Italy, and Greek music was brought from Greece, neither ever facing the challenge of being taken or changed, the blues, which evolved into jazz, stand. Whereas the staff and certain notations were used in its organization, these are the elements that, I believe, some white Americans want to use to justify their ownership. This is not enough to claim anything, let alone ownership. This music had to do with the ear of its founders, its creators. Essentially, because of the importance to the culture of black people, the women are involved in the preservation of the art form, our legacy, our contribution to this country. One would believe that this would be sufficient proof that, just as other cultures contributed to America, so have we. The made-up story of racism must be defeated. For it is nothing. My interest in the role of the jazz widow was inspired by the late Mona Hinton, the wife of Milt Hinton, a legendary bassist who was featured with the renowned Cab Calloway and his 18-piece orchestra. The band traveled across the United States and abroad. However, their road trips in America were mostly traveled by bus, which took them to areas that were historically dangerous, due to racism. For black people, especially 18 black men and women, Jim Crow was alive and well. Another hanging would only be another heinous event (an event that was never justified), just for sport, as it had been many, many times in America. From 2005 to 2008, I was the featured vocalist with the Count Basie Orchestra, touring across the country and abroad. The men in the band were very young, in their twenties and thirties, except the leader, Bill Hughes, John Williams and myself. As we traveled by bus, stopping for food and other supplies, I listened to these men as people who were conscious of the lurking dangers, tales, memories and the feelings of black men in America, feelings of those aware of what could happen. In my heart, I felt hurt that even after so many years and so many changes, they had to experience this kind of abuse. After all, we pay taxes and participate in everything that the law requires of its citizens here in America. Why in the 21st century should we be exposed to such treatment, made to feel this inhuman way? This is the true reason the women went on the road with their men. They were there protecting their men and the dreams of their men. The Monas who travelled with their men. Having the experience of watching a documentary of the road trips of Cab Calloway and knowledge of Mona Hinton’s story about how her husband, Milt, who was featured with the Cab Calloway Orchestra, traveling across the country and what they had to do in order to stay safe. Although Cab was very light skinned, this was only one portion of the band’s protection. He would, most likely, not be attacked. They would park the band bus some distance from a restaurant for safety. Mona was actually a roadie and a security guard. That’s what we call assistants who perform errands as the band sits and waits for whatever needs to be done. One black person is not a threat, especially a woman. In this case, Mona would go to the back of the restaurant and purchase food for everyone. As Mona and I spoke about the challenges of riding on the bus with all these men, my heart sank. These are not the words of Mona, but a woman knows the heart of other women. We know the story of an American life and of the mistreatment of black men. As I revealed that I had seen the documentary, she only had this to say, “Melba, please don’t let them forget me.” Over the course of two years, I personally interviewed eight jazz widows, recording their accounts of their lives, struggles and accomplishments. Like the music we created, so revolutionary in spirit, so is the spirit of a black woman who is in love. I am confident that the reader will appreciate the depth of the jazz song, this road that many of these legendary artists forged with the help and steadfast dedication of their wives. Thank you. Melba Joyce Jazz artist and author
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Jazz History and Research
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5160
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
x, 162 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Melba Joyce Bradford
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Jazz--History and criticism
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Musicians' spouses
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Jazz musicians--Social networks
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3MK69W6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bradford
GivenName
Melba
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-25 09:49:51
AssociatedEntity
Name
Melba Bradford
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-05-02
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 2nd, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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