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Microevolution in Coccolithophores

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TitleInfo
Title
Microevolution in Coccolithophores
SubTitle
examples from the Paleocene-Eocene
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bord
NamePart (type = given)
David
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
David Bord
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aubry
NamePart (type = given)
Marie-Pierre
DisplayForm
Marie-Pierre Aubry
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Miller
NamePart (type = given)
Kenneth
DisplayForm
Kenneth Miller
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McGhee
NamePart (type = given)
George
DisplayForm
George McGhee
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Krieger
NamePart (type = given)
Jonathan
DisplayForm
Jonathan Krieger
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Morphologic variability is a major theme in microevolutionary studies. Variations provide the raw material from which opportunities for selection are generated, leading to speciation. Three modes of evolution have been described from the paleontological record— Gradualism (gradual evolution implying continuous changes over a long time span), Punctuated Equilibrium (stable morphologies evolving through abrupt jumps), and Punctuated Anagenesis (gradual shifts between stable morphologies). There are only a handful of papers that illustrate unambiguously these models, and none involved the coccolithophores. The latter are, however, an ideal taxonomic group for evolutionary studies, with rapid generational turnovers, high morphological diversity and abundance, and long fossil record. I present three tests in this dissertation. In the first study, I test the significance of morphological variability in the species Ellipsolithus macellus in terms of genetic versus phenotypic expression, represented by, respectively, cryptic speciation versus adaptation to oligotrophication of the early Paleocene (Danian) Ocean. In the second study, I test for gradualism versus stasis in the short lived (370 kyr) early Eocene species Heliodiscoaster mahmoudii, and show that morphological fixation was achieved after 83 kyr (20% of the range of the species). In the third study, I first follow up on the previous study to confirm morphologic fixation in two other species that are part of the early Eocene Tribrachiatus lineage, T. bramlettei being ancestral to T. contortus. I then test for abrupt versus gradual morphological change during the evolutionary divergence of T. contortus from T. bramlettei. I show that speciation in this lineage follows the model of Punctuated Gradualism, or Punctuated Anagenesis. The T. bramlettei-T. contortus transition occurs over 73 kyr during which high morphologic variability occurs and after which the T. contortus morphology is fixated. Prior to the transition the T. bramlettei morphology was also fixated. This thesis unambiguously illustrates examples of Punctuated Anagenesis in the Coccolithophores. Stasis (low morphologic variability) is the primary mode that characterizes species during most of their life span. Speciation events are short episodes of high morphologic variability (25% higher than during stasis) during which morphologic fixation of the new species is progressively achieved.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Geological Sciences
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5101
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xi, 186 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by David Bord
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Coccolithophores--Morphology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Coccolithophores--Evolution
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3639MRQ
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Bord
GivenName
David
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-09-30 19:24:40
AssociatedEntity
Name
David Bord
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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