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Supply chain contracting as disagreement management

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Supply chain contracting as disagreement management
SubTitle
institutionalizing procurement practice through communication design
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Laureij
NamePart (type = given)
Leon V.
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Leon Laureij
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Aakhus
NamePart (type = given)
Mark
DisplayForm
Mark Aakhus
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Scott
NamePart (type = given)
Craig R
DisplayForm
Craig R Scott
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gibbs
NamePart (type = given)
Jennifer L
DisplayForm
Jennifer L Gibbs
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Poole
NamePart (type = given)
Marshall Scott
DisplayForm
Marshall Scott Poole
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The formation and change of institutions in society has become a focal point of interest for institutional practitioners and researchers. Contracting for supply chain management (SCM) is a widespread institutional practice that implicates an increasing and diverse network of people, organizations, and organizing activities. It also informs how such a large-scale institution is formed through communication. This dissertation answers the question, How does the contracting process of SCM shape interaction into functional forms of communication that address problems and challenges in the pursuit of a supply chain’s technical and social goals? It addresses the practical problem that supply chain design is narrowly focused on material flows of goods, services, and funds. It advances the design stance toward communication (Aakhus & Jackson, 2005) to supplement and extend related theories: institutional theory, the communicative constitution of organizing, communication pragmatics, and design. So it aims to restore normative instrumentality in explaining the interactional construction of institutions, particularly of supply chain contracting. To test and develop this communication-design view of contracting, a case study was conducted of the contracting process at a large public university in the northeast of the United States. Using ethnography and ethnomethodology, the process was reconstructed as a practice for designing and managing common institutional disagreements and arguments about contracts and contracting. Based on this normative-descriptive process reconstruction, a typology was derived of three distinct types of argumentative issues that practitioners order hierarchically for disagreement management. They use it for strategic management of issues about (a) (proposed) supply chain relationships and operations; (b) performances of contracting actions; and (c) institutional activities constitutive of individual actions and the overall practice. The design issues typology is central to how contracting activity is ‘communication-design rationally’ constructed in response to and anticipation of (potential) problems in SCM. It facilitates identification of different types of process breakdowns, which were seen to either autocorrect the process, or to obstruct the institutional legitimacy and/or organizational effectiveness of contracting activity. The findings carry important implications for the design stance and related theories about institutional formation, and for the contracting practice of the research site and SCM at large.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5111
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xii, 429 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Leon V. Laureij
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Business logistics--Contracting out
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3Z60M26
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Laureij
GivenName
Leon
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-01 10:46:48
AssociatedEntity
Name
Leon Laureij
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2015-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2015.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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