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Narratives of African improvement

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TitleInfo
Title
Narratives of African improvement
SubTitle
missions, humanitarianism, and the novel
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Paustian
NamePart (type = given)
Megan Cole
NamePart (type = date)
1984-
DisplayForm
Megan Paustian
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
McClure
NamePart (type = given)
John A.
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John A. McClure
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Walkowitz
NamePart (type = given)
Rebecca
DisplayForm
Rebecca Walkowitz
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
ROBOLIN
NamePart (type = given)
STEPHANE
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STEPHANE ROBOLIN
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Olaniyan
NamePart (type = given)
Tejumola
DisplayForm
Tejumola Olaniyan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2013
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2013-10
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
“Narratives of African Improvement: Missions, Humanitarianism, and the Novel” explores the relationship between narrative and international development, analyzing literature’s contribution to debates about religious and humanitarian missions. International plans for improving Africa consistently operate on the basis of what I call the Mission narrative, the optimistic story of benevolent Westerners offering salvation to supposedly benighted Africans. Drawing on sociopolitical critiques, this dissertation begins from the premise that many of the dangers and disasters that characterize humanitarian action are related to the narrative through which it frames its task. If narrative is the problem, I ask what role the novel—that extended, complicated, multifaceted form of narrative—might take in imagining and articulating better narratives of African improvement. To that end, I define a micro-genre of critical literature that I term the critical mission novel, which works to dismantle the grand Mission narrative while also taking seriously the urgent questions it raises about global inequity and the ethics of transnational concern. Each chapter focuses on a problematic node within the Mission narrative—the manifestation of faith, emancipation through foreign sources, the concept of universal humanity, and the politics of giving—exploring how a set of novels critiques and rethinks it. Each of these nodes is deeply fraught, on the one hand extremely dangerous and the other intensely compelling, thus opening up an ambivalent field of rejection and tentative embrace. Building this kind of problem-based literary history, results in a thoroughly transnational project which brings together African, British, and U.S. writers typically read within separate traditions, including Joseph Conrad, Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Bessie Head, Tstitsi Dangarembga, Barbara Kingsolver, Philip Caputo, Nuruddin Farah, and Zakes Mda. These novelists demystify and reinvent the vocabulary of benevolence, situate “ethical” interventions within a political network of social relations, and negotiate the tension between utopian desire and real world necessity, cultivating points of resonance with non-ideal allies in non-ideal times. Humanitarian thought and action have been hindered by various fictions—the fictions of African darkness, Western enlightenment, inevitable progress, and spectacular salvation—all posing as truth. Ironically, fiction itself may hold the most sophisticated alternatives.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_4948
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
vii, 261 p.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Megan Cole Paustian
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Humanitarianism--Africa
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Postcolonialism--Africa
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Postcolonialism in literature
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Humanitarianism in literature
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3VX0DKR
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Paustian
GivenName
Megan
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-08-22 12:19:34
AssociatedEntity
Name
Megan Paustian
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2015-10-31
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 31st, 2015.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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