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TitleInfo
Title
That one
SubTitle
the effects of displays of anger and contempt during the 2008 Presidential debates
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Frazier
NamePart (type = given)
Ian Reynolds
NamePart (type = date)
1985-
DisplayForm
Ian Frazier
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Roseman
NamePart (type = given)
Ira
DisplayForm
Ira Roseman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Markey
NamePart (type = given)
Charlotte
DisplayForm
Charlotte Markey
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Nave
NamePart (type = given)
Chris
DisplayForm
Chris Nave
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
The present research investigates how the emotional content of negative political discourse might affect candidate evaluations. Of specific interest is how the display of two emotions of negative valence, anger versus contempt, will affect participants' evaluation of Barack Obama and John McCain from the 2008 presidential debates. The literature review focuses on establishing a conceptual framework for the characteristics of anger and contempt and their social functions and discusses research into the effects of negative campaigning. Participants filled out questionnaires before and after watching an excerpt from the 3rd 2008 US Presidential debate. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups, in which they rated either their feelings of anger and contempt toward the candidates, their favorable or unfavorable impressions of the candidates, or the candidates' expressions of anger and contempt. It was predicted that anger would be more effective than contempt for unaffiliated participants (H1: unsupported); strong Democrats would feel more contempt relative to unaffiliated participants (H2: data in predicted direction but non-significant); strong Democrats would perceive more contempt relative to unaffiliated participants (H3: unsupported); contempt would be more effective for Republicans, conservatives, and strong partisans from both parties as compared to Democrats, liberals, and weak partisans respectively (H4a & b: unsupported; H5: data in predicted direction but non-significant). Supplementary analyses found that watching the debate improved Obama's favorability, McCain displayed more anger and contempt than Obama, and that liberals are significantly more expressive of anger and contempt than moderates and conservatives. The theoretical and practical implications of this research are discussed as insight into what types of negative political messaging (campaigning) works best and for which audiences.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5320
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
iii, 77 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ian Reynolds Frazier
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Anger
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Contempt (Attitude)
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Television viewers--United States--Attitudes
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Presidents--United States--Election--2008--Public opinion
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
McCain, John,--1936-
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Obama, Barack
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mass media--Political aspects--United States--Public opinion
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Communication in politics--United States--Public opinion
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10005600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30R9MH8
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Frazier
GivenName
Ian
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-01-22 10:18:21
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ian Frazier
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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