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Cultural literacy assimilation

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TitleInfo
Title
Cultural literacy assimilation
SubTitle
the literacy experiences of children of immigrants
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rosen
NamePart (type = given)
Dana
DisplayForm
Dana Rosen
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boling
NamePart (type = given)
Erica
DisplayForm
Erica Boling
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morrow
NamePart (type = given)
Lesley
DisplayForm
Lesley Morrow
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sargent
NamePart (type = given)
Tanja
DisplayForm
Tanja Sargent
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rowsell
NamePart (type = given)
Jennifer
DisplayForm
Jennifer Rowsell
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Although students’ literacy practices are influenced by a variety of sources, including texts, teachers, peers, the media, and their home culture (Dyson, 1993), the process of becoming literate is truly grounded in their cultural beliefs (Ferdman, 1990). Literacy skills are embedded in cultural practice, and cultural practice is learned implicitly through participating within the culture (Purcell-Gates, 1995). This research explored the literate worlds of non-mainstream families to determine how culture and literacy could be merged effectively. The purpose of this comparative case study was to determine how literacy practices are developed through cultural and family ideologies, or the ideas reflecting the social needs and aspirations of a culture. The research attempted to find what types of culturally specific literacy practices existed among students of immigrant families by concentrating on literacy practices, purposes for literacy, and cultural values. Other questions explored how these practices contributed to literacy development, how particular purposes for literacy guided the learner's sense of cultural action, and how literacy and identity varied across cultures. The goal of this study was to recognize and acknowledge the complex nature of transnational communities and their cultural systems that contributed to the literacy practices within and among immigrant families. Another important goal was to understand how these experiences interfaced with school and community literacy practices. Using a comparative case study methodology (Creswell, 1998), this study explored the interaction between literacy and culture to portray the literacy events and practices of four 2nd grade students from a local elementary school. Data were collected through observations, interviews, questionnaires, home visits, photographic evidence, and journals. Data consisted of one survey for the parents to indicate components of family history and ethnicity. I also asked students to use a journal to write about their language, literacy, or cultural events, and take photographs of their home. I then asked students to discuss and describe their journals and photographs together in a focus group interview. The data also consisted of two (or more) home visits to gain firsthand knowledge of the family dynamics, the home layout, and material artifacts, as well as two interviews with the family members to determine relevant background and cultural information. Interview protocols, observation records, and artifact collection forms were designed to investigate further the central research questions as well as issues raised by the literature review, and finally, to facilitate data analysis. The research was viewed through a sociocultural lens. A sociocultural perspective maintains that behavior and cognitive processes are shaped in a large part by a social and cultural context (Vygotsky, 1978). Sociocultural theory, best explained through the work of Vygotsky (1978/1986), asserts that in order to fully understand a child, one must first examine the social world in which his or her life developed.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literacy Education
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5207
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
x, 268 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Dana Rosen
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Literacy
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Children of immigrants--Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Acculturation
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3HX19TX
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Rosen
GivenName
Dana
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2013-12-13 15:27:37
AssociatedEntity
Name
Dana Rosen
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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