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Simple modeling solutions for complex conservation problems

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TitleInfo
Title
Simple modeling solutions for complex conservation problems
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robinson
NamePart (type = given)
Orin J.
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
Orin Robinson Jr.
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lockwood
NamePart (type = given)
Julie L
DisplayForm
Julie L Lockwood
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fefferman
NamePart (type = given)
Nina H
DisplayForm
Nina H Fefferman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Jensen
NamePart (type = given)
Olaf P
DisplayForm
Olaf P Jensen
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Reed
NamePart (type = given)
Michael
DisplayForm
Michael Reed
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-01
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Species are going extinct at a rate far higher than pre-human levels. For many species that are endangered, basic biological information may not be available to conservation managers. In these situations, mathematical models can be useful in providing insight into the biological requirements of species and to make credible predictions about how management actions may. Here, I present three modeling techniques that help to show the efficacy of management actions (Chapters 1&2) and the effects of exploitation on species with unique life histories (Chapter 3). I show that combining two foundational elements of ecological theory (matrix population models and functional responses) into one coupled model provides a flexible approach to determining the best conservation strategy to recover prey under threat from an invasive predator. I suggest a simple addition to existing population viability models that allows managers to calculate the probability that management action will improve the status of a declining population and the probability that enacting management will be no more effective than doing nothing. I illustrate the method by using previously published population viability analyses. For some management situations, doing nothing may be just as effective as enacting an expensive management strategy. Calculating these probabilities can provide tangible ways to balance risk and reward when making management decisions. Last, I present a game theoretic approach to model the behavior of sex changing fish. I produced estimates of maximum sustainable yield (MSY), biomass at maximum sustainable yield (BMSY), and sex ratio for sex changing and non-sex changing stocks at different levels of fishing pressure and varying fertilization rates. The results suggest that sex changing stocks may be as robust to fishing as non-sex changing stocks. This game theoretic approach to evaluating hermaphroditic stocks can accommodate a wide variety of sex changing cues and allows a flexible model for understanding the effects of exploitation on hermaphroditic stocks. Models have proven useful in many conservation situations and will continue to aid managers. I have shown that simple additions to traditional models can provide more insight on the efficacy of management and how unique breeding behavior may be incorporated into conservation decision-making.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Ecology and Evolution
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5273
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xii, 89 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Orin J. Robinson Jr.
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Wildlife conservation--Management
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Animal diversity conservation
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3NC5Z8V
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Robinson Jr.
GivenName
Orin
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-01-02 12:59:10
AssociatedEntity
Name
Orin Robinson Jr.
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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