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Letter, Frances Cooper to Emil Cuntz, Hoboken, August 3, 1862.

Descriptive

Location
PhysicalLocation (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives)
Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives
TypeOfResource
Text
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Digital exhibition
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
Letter, Frances Cooper to Emil Cuntz, Hoboken, August 3, 1862. Cooper Family Papers
Relationship
Describes
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Introduction: The Home Front
Detail
“Oh for an end to this war!” wrote Frances Cooper of Hoboken to her fiancé, German-speaker Emil Cuntz, in August 1862, little knowing that the war would continue for almost three more years. Her statement epitomizes the Civil War in New Jersey, where a conflict that the state entered reluctantly seemed never-ending. New Jersey, the only free state in the North not to support Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 election, was initially divided over the war, although ultimately most people supported the Union cause. On the home front, women, children, and the elderly struggled to keep farms and businesses afloat in the absence of husbands and fathers. Women played an important role in raising money for the war, although their participation was limited by the social expectations of the time. While African Americans welcomed the fight to abolish slavery, they were constrained in their participation in the conflict by the segregated society of the day. The first nine sections of this online exhibition explores the impact of the Civil War on the home front in New Jersey.
AssociatedObject
Type
Placement in digital exhibition
Name
1
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Project manager
Name
Radick, Caryn.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civi War
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact); (keyDate = yes)
1862-08-03
TitleInfo
Title
Letter, Frances Cooper to Emil Cuntz, Hoboken, August 3, 1862.
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
image/tiff
InternetMediaType
image/jpeg
Extent
2 p.
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002220
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = local); (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections)
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39W0CMG
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = RU_Archives); (ID = RU_Archives_v5)
This work is made available for non-commercial educational, scholarly, or research purposes subject to the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Proper attribution must be provided.
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Source

Shelving
Locator (TYPE = Call number)
MC 1138
Note
Cooper Family Papers, folder 3
ProvenanceEvent
Type
Exhibition
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Place
Special Collections and University Archives Gallery and Gallery '50, Rutgers University
DateTime (point = start); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2012-09-19
DateTime (point = end); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2013-08-31
AssociatedEntity
Role
curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Introduction: The Home Front
Detail
“Oh for an end to this war!” wrote Frances Cooper of Hoboken to her fiancé, German-speaker Emil Cuntz, in August 1862, little knowing that the war would continue for almost three more years. Her statement epitomizes the Civil War in New Jersey, where a conflict that the state entered reluctantly seemed never-ending. New Jersey, the only free state in the North not to support Abraham Lincoln in the 1860 election, was initially divided over the war, although ultimately most people supported the Union cause. On the home front, women, children, and the elderly struggled to keep farms and businesses afloat in the absence of husbands and fathers. Women played an important role in raising money for the war, although their participation was limited by the social expectations of the time. While African Americans welcomed the fight to abolish slavery, they were constrained in their participation in the conflict by the segregated society of the day. This gallery explores the impact of the Civil War on the home front in New Jersey.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
Letter, Frances Cooper to Emil Cuntz, Hoboken, August 3, 1862. Cooper Family Papers
SourceTechnical
SourceType
Text or graphic (paper)
Extent (Unit = page(s))
2 p.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Photograph
RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL2)
ContentModel
Photograph
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