Staff View
Ward Hospital Bulletin vol. 1, no. 7, August 10, 1865.

Descriptive

Location
PhysicalLocation (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives)
Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections and University Archives
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = local); (displayLabel = Rutgers University. Libraries. Special Collections)
TypeOfResource
Text
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Digital exhibition
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
The Ward Hospital Bulletin was an in-house newspaper written by staff members. Seven issues were printed between June and August of 1865 and its purpose was to both inform and entertain hospital inmates. This August 10th issue contains a series of updates regarding hospital statistics, rules and regulations for patients and visitors, and post office and religious service schedules. Additionally, there are several advertisements for local photographers and businesses including the Marcus L. Ward’s Office for Soldiers. Marcus L. Ward Papers
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Home Front Hospitals: Marcus Ward's U.S. General Hospital
Detail
After the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, it was clear that the war would be longer and more brutal than previously imagined. This reality was commonly experienced in battlefield hospitals - makeshift hospitals comprised of tents or borrowed houses that were overcrowded and unsanitary. In order to alleviate congestion and poor conditions, military hospitals on the home front were instituted. These hospitals were equipped with experienced doctors, modern medical supplies, and amenities such as bathing facilities and full kitchens. Soldiers who suffered from injury or illness (including gunshot wounds, gangrene, typhoid fever, malaria, tuberculosis, and camp diarrhea) were sufficiently treated and sometimes even had the convenience of being close to home. By the war’s end, 192 general hospitals existed in the United States. One such hospital was Ward’s U.S. General Hospital located in Newark, New Jersey.Ward’s U.S. General Hospital opened in May of 1862. Named after its founder, Marcus L. Ward, a New Jersey businessman, governor, and advocate for soldiers and their families, it was one of three in the state (including those in Jersey City and Beverly) to accommodate sick and injured soldiers. Initially paid for by a loan secured by Ward from the state government, the hospital was located in a four-storied building between the railroad tracks and the Passaic River at the foot of Centre Street. This location made it easy for soldiers to be transported by car or by boat. When the secretary of war allocated additional funding in 1864, the hospital expanded into several factory and warehouse buildings east of Centre Street and had room for 1,400 patients. By the time the hospital was decommissioned in 1865, staff members had treated roughly 80,000 military patients.
AssociatedObject
Type
Placement in digital exhibition
Name
6
AssociatedEntity
Role
Curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Project manager
Name
Radick, Caryn.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civi War
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
image/jpeg
TitleInfo
Title
Ward Hospital Bulletin vol. 1, no. 7, August 10, 1865.
OriginInfo
DateIssued (encoding = iso8601); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
1865-08-10
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Identifier (type = local)
rucore00000002220
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38K7774
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = RU_Archives); (ID = RU_Archives_v5)
This work is made available for non-commercial educational, scholarly, or research purposes subject to the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Proper attribution must be provided.
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Source

Shelving
Note
NEWSP-The Pennington Post, Box 35, Folder 15
Locator (TYPE = Call number)
Ac. 3193
ProvenanceEvent
Type
Exhibition
Label
Struggle Without End: New Jersey and the Civil War
Place
Special Collections and University Archives Gallery and Gallery '50, Rutgers University
DateTime (point = start); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2012-09-19
DateTime (point = end); (encoding = iso8601); (qualifier = exact)
2013-08-31
AssociatedEntity
Role
curator
Name
Perrone, Fernanda.
AssociatedEntity
Role
Funder
Name
New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition case
Relationship
Forms part of
Name
Home Front Hospitals: Marcus Ward's U.S. General Hospital
Detail
After the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, it was clear that the war would be longer and more brutal than previously imagined. This reality was commonly experienced in battlefield hospitals - makeshift hospitals comprised of tents or borrowed houses that were overcrowded and unsanitary. In order to alleviate congestion and poor conditions, military hospitals on the home front were instituted. These hospitals were equipped with experienced doctors, modern medical supplies, and amenities such as bathing facilities and full kitchens. Soldiers who suffered from injury or illness (including gunshot wounds, gangrene, typhoid fever, malaria, tuberculosis, and camp diarrhea) were sufficiently treated and sometimes even had the convenience of being close to home. By the war’s end, 192 general hospitals existed in the United States. One such hospital was Ward’s U.S. General Hospital located in Newark, New Jersey.Ward’s U.S. General Hospital opened in May of 1862. Named after its founder, Marcus L. Ward, a New Jersey businessman, governor, and advocate for soldiers and their families, it was one of three in the state (including those in Jersey City and Beverly) to accommodate sick and injured soldiers. Initially paid for by a loan secured by Ward from the state government, the hospital was located in a four-storied building between the railroad tracks and the Passaic River at the foot of Centre Street. This location made it easy for soldiers to be transported by car or by boat. When the secretary of war allocated additional funding in 1864, the hospital expanded into several factory and warehouse buildings east of Centre Street and had room for 1,400 patients. By the time the hospital was decommissioned in 1865, staff members had treated roughly 80,000 military patients.
AssociatedObject
Type
Exhibition caption
Detail
The Ward Hospital Bulletin was an in-house newspaper written by staff members. Seven issues were printed between June and August of 1865 and its purpose was to both inform and entertain hospital inmates. This August 10th issue contains a series of updates regarding hospital statistics, rules and regulations for patients and visitors, and post office and religious service schedules. Additionally, there are several advertisements for local photographers and businesses including the Marcus L. Ward’s Office for Soldiers.
Detail
Exhibition extended beyond dates listed on catalog.
SourceTechnical
SourceType
Text or graphic (paper)
Extent (Unit = page(s))
1 p.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Photograph
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