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Leading from the closet

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
Leading from the closet
SubTitle
toward a new theory of educational leadership
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Dumaresq
NamePart (type = given)
Jocelyn
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Jocelyn Dumaresq
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ryan
NamePart (type = given)
Sharom
DisplayForm
Sharom Ryan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Lesko
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy
DisplayForm
Nancy Lesko
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mangin
NamePart (type = given)
Melinda
DisplayForm
Melinda Mangin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Although progress has been made in the name of queer rights over the past few years, heterosexism and homophobia still pervade public schools. According to a report of the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (2011), in 2010, 81.9% of queer students were verbally harassed, 38.3% were physically harassed and 18.3% were physically assaulted at school because of their sexual orientation. To address this enduring homophobia, educational leaders must take the initiative to bring about changes that will make the culture of schools more inclusive. Research suggests that queer and other minority leaders are more likely to advocate for these social justice changes due to their heightened sensitivity to issues of advocacy (Denton, 2009; Fraynd & Capper, 2003; Tooms, 2007). Yet, educators who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (queer) are often stymied in this kind of social justice work for fear of losing their jobs. Further, despite their potential for enacting social justice, there is a paucity of research on queer leaders and no leadership theory inclusive enough to consider the perspectives of queers. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of queer educational leaders with the aim of developing a queer theory of educational leadership. This qualitative study sought to answer the following questions: What are the experiences of queer leaders? How has their sexuality mediated their leadership practices? and What do their experiences suggest for a queer theory of leadership practice? Using snowball sampling, I located 15 participants and conducted semi- structured, two-part interviews with each of them. The data gathered from the interviews was analyzed using both narrative analysis and grounded theory approaches (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). Narrative analysis provided a window into the diversity of experiences among my participants, while grounded theory led to the development of a model of queer leadership. This model illustrates how queer leaders lead from the closet (Sedgwick, 1990; Silin, 1995), which is both a function of, and subject to, the heterosexual matrix (Butler, 1990). However, while most theorists have written about the closet as a repressive structure (Sedgwick, 1990; Silin, 1995), the experiences of these leaders illustrate that the closet provides the necessary protection in order for them to subvert the cycle of discrimination, fear, isolation and regret produced by dominant discourses (Foucault, 1980). This subversion, or leading for social justice, involved advocating for diverse students, serving as a queer educational resource, passing inclusive policies and programs and representing a queer role model for students. This study not only gives voice to a marginalized population but also suggests that leadership preparation programs must more explicitly address queer issues. Networks of support for queer leaders that cross district and regional boundaries are also needed if educational leaders are to be able to challenge the heterosexism and homophobia that dominates schools.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Educational Leadership
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5545
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
viii, 163 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Jocelyn Dumaresq
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educational leadership
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Homophobia in schools
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Educators--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Gay teachers
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GX48SW
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Dumaresq
GivenName
Jocelyn
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-04-18 19:29:31
AssociatedEntity
Name
Jocelyn Dumaresq
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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