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Bull's eye-hand coordination

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TitleInfo
Title
Bull's eye-hand coordination
SubTitle
visual and motor contributions to observational learning
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Blanchard
NamePart (type = given)
Ashley
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Ashley Blanchard
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
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NamePart (type = family)
LoBue
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Vanessa
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Vanessa LoBue
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Shiffrar
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Maggie
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Maggie Shiffrar
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Van de Walle
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Gretchen
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Gretchen Van de Walle
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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Tricomi
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Eebie
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Eebie Tricomi
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
van der Wel
NamePart (type = given)
Robrecht
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Robrecht van der Wel
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Watching other people move affords observers many benefits such as presenting opportunities for social interactions, deciphering other’s intentions and emotional states, and learning new motor skills. Observational motor learning is the process of learning to perform a novel motor skill by watching others execute that skill. Common coding theories of the visual and motor representations of actions allow for a relationship between action observation and action execution that makes observational motor learning possible. More specific theories related to observational learning conflict in terms of whether observed actions are first represented at the kinematic level or at the action goal level. The overarching goal of this series of experiments was to increase our understanding of how the visual system and the motor system work together to enhance action learning. Experiments 1 and 2 examined the influence of model expertise on observational learning of dart throwing. Dart throwing was selected as the motor task of interest because it has been used previously in perception-action coupling research and because it represents an ecologically valid complex motor task. This differs from past research on action learning which has tended to rely on simple, contrived motor skills. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants threw darts before and after they watched an expert or a novice dart throwing model. To rule out the possibility that the observation of any dart throwing actions might improve an observer’s ability to throw darts, Experiment 2 included an additional control condition involving a model playing basketball. No significant differences were found in participants’ dart throwing abilities after the observation of either dart thrower or the basketball player. Instead, physical practice effects were sufficient to account for all improvements in dart throwing performance. Experiments 3 and 4 used measures of visual sensitivity, rather than motor performance, to assess the motor system’s contributions to visual learning of other people’s actions. Action observation is thought to involve an action simulation process that impacts an observer’s ability to predict the outcomes of other people’s actions. Thus, if an observer’s motor system is otherwise engaged, that observer should be compromised in his or her ability to simulate another person’s actions and as a result, should demonstrate deficits in predicting action outcomes. In Experiment 3, participants completed a dart throwing prediction task before and after the observation of an expert dart thrower. The outcomes of this dart thrower’s actions (i.e., where darts landed) were only visible in the observation phase. Importantly, during this action observation phase, participants’ motor systems were engaged to allow for the determination of core characteristics of the action simulation process. The results suggest that some types of motor system engagement reduce action prediction capabilities. Interestingly, significant inverse correlations were found between physical effort during motor engagement and action prediction accuracy. Experiment 4 investigated the theoretical common coding between the visual and motor systems by assessing the relative impacts of visual and nonvisual motor training on action outcome prediction. Participants completed the action prediction task from Experiment 3 before and after performing visual or nonvisual motor training. In the nonvisual training condition, participants physically performed dart throwing while their vision of their throwing arm was occluded. In the visual training condition, participants physically performed dart throwing with full vision of their throwing arm. Lastly, in a control condition, participants played basketball. Participants in the nonvisual motor training condition demonstrated the largest gain in visual sensitivity in the action prediction task. In conclusion, while the results of these experiments lend partial support for the common coding theory in general, they do not differentiate between specific perception-action coupling theories. Nonetheless, the current results do raise important questions about the generalizability of simple motor action studies to more complex, real world actions. Additionally, exciting future directions are revealed by the results of these experiments.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Motor ability--Observations
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Observation (Psychology)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5581
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xiv, 184 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Ashley Blanchard
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Eye-hand coordination
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GB229H
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Blanchard
GivenName
Ashley
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-04-25 12:15:17
AssociatedEntity
Name
Ashley Blanchard
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

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ETD
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windows xp
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