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Banquo's ghost

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TitleInfo
Title
Banquo's ghost
SubTitle
the Russian revolution in new Negro thought
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Heideman
NamePart (type = given)
Paul M.
NamePart (type = date)
1984-
DisplayForm
Paul Heideman
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Foley
NamePart (type = given)
Barbara
DisplayForm
Barbara Foley
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stephens
NamePart (type = given)
Michelle
DisplayForm
Michelle Stephens
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Satter
NamePart (type = given)
Beryl
DisplayForm
Beryl Satter
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - Newark
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This study examines the place of the Russian Revolution in postwar black intellectual circles. It argues that interpretations of the revolution by New Negro writers such as James Weldon Johnson, A. Philip Randolph, and Cyril Briggs shaped their political and intellectual trajectories through the postwar years. Though each emerged with a quite different political orientation than the others, the engagement with Russia was central in the ideological evolution of them all. By demonstrating the revolution's role in shaping the political trajectories of New Negro activists, this study offers a new foundation for the study of the debates over the direction of black struggle between figures like Johnson, Randolph, and those associated with the Communist Party that occurred during the Depression and later. More generally, the careers of Johnson, Randolph, and Briggs illustrate the necessity for a return to intellectual history in New Negro studies. While the kinds of cultural and social histories that have been written in recent years have advanced our understanding of the postwar moment in important ways, the neglect of attention to the explicit political and theoretical commitments of New Negro writers and activists, along with the intellectual background of those commitments and the ways they shaped the movement's ideological evolution, has obscured the moment's intellectual heterogeneity. Although Johnson, Randolph, and Briggs all ended up in positions quite opposed to each other, in the postwar moment their ideas were much more fluid, as Briggs, the hardened black nationalist, flirted with Wilsonianism and Johnson, the NAACP liberal, spoke of impossibility of democracy in a country governed by millionaires. Only through careful reconstruction of their explicit political positions can the ideological transformations these figures would undergo be explained. By situating these New Negro writers in their intellectual moment, and tracing how their thought with respect to the revolution changed over time, this study demonstrates that interpretations of the revolution helped shape the political evolution of New Negro thought
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
American Studies
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5624
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
iv, 247 p.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = vita)
Includes vita
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Paul M. Heideman
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Johnson, James Weldon,--1871-1938--Criticism and interpretation
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Randolph, A. Philip--(Asa Philip),--1889-1979--Criticism and interpretation
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Briggs, Cyril V.--(Cyril Valentine),--1888-1966--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Harlem Renaissance--Russian influences
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Soviet Union--History--Revolution, 1917-1921
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10002600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3X928JT
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Heideman
GivenName
Paul
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-04-30 20:05:47
AssociatedEntity
Name
Paul Heideman
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - Newark
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2019-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2019.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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