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Variability in the fraction of ambient fine particulate matter in indoor air and implications for air pollution epidemiology

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TitleInfo
Title
Variability in the fraction of ambient fine particulate matter in indoor air and implications for air pollution epidemiology
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hodas
NamePart (type = given)
Natasha
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Natasha Hodas
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Turpin
NamePart (type = given)
Barbara
DisplayForm
Barbara Turpin
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Miller
NamePart (type = given)
Mark A
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Mark A Miller
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Carlton
NamePart (type = given)
Annmarie
DisplayForm
Annmarie Carlton
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Meng
NamePart (type = given)
Qingyu
DisplayForm
Qingyu Meng
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with multiple negative health outcomes. Studies investigating these associations commonly use PM2.5 concentrations measured at outdoor, central-site monitors to estimate exposure. Because people spend the majority of time indoors, however, the variable efficiency with which ambient PM2.5 penetrates and persists indoors is a source of error in epidemiologic analyses. This error generally results in an underestimation of health effects, hampering the detection of associations between ambient PM2.5 exposures and the risk of health outcomes. To reduce this error, practical methods to model indoor concentrations of ambient PM2.5 are needed. This dissertation contributes to exposure science by advancing existing models of residential exposure to ambient PM2.5 and by improving the robustness and accessibility of these tools. First, drivers of variability in the fraction of ambient PM2.5 found indoors (F) are identified and the potential for this variability to explain observed heterogeneity in PM-mediated health-effect estimates is explored. Next, a physically-based mass-balance model and modeling tools that account for variability in human activity patterns (e.g. time spent in various indoor and outdoor environments) are used to compute ambient PM2.5 exposures that account for the modification of PM2.5 with outdoor-to-indoor transport in order to explore whether the use of these refined exposure surrogates reduces error and bias in epidemiologic analyses. Subsequently, this outdoor-to-indoor transport model is evaluated and refined using measured indoor and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations and air exchange rates, providing a practical and robust tool for reducing exposure misclassification in epidemiologic studies. Finally, the volatility basis set is used for the first time to study shifts in the gas-particle partitioning of ambient organics with transport indoors. This dissertation provides guidance regarding measurements and data most critically needed to facilitate the prediction of refined exposure surrogates in large epidemiological studies and, thus, informs the design of future sampling campaigns and epidemiologic studies. It enables a better accounting of ambient particle penetration into and persistence in the indoor environment and constitutes an important advancement in the efforts to reduce exposure error in epidemiologic studies and to elucidate relationships between PM2.5 exposure and adverse health outcomes.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Atmospheric Science
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5330
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xv, 293 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Natasha Hodas
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Indoor air pollution--Research
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Indoor air quality
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Environmental toxicology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GB22CD
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Hodas
GivenName
Natasha
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-02-14 17:25:10
AssociatedEntity
Name
Natasha Hodas
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2014-11-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after November 30th, 2014.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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