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“‘Ghastly females' and 'wanton corrosion'

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TitleInfo
Title
“‘Ghastly females' and 'wanton corrosion'
SubTitle
the appropriation and modernization of German old master motifs in Otto Dix's images of Weimar women"
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Magnusen
NamePart (type = given)
Kaia L.
NamePart (type = date)
1983-
DisplayForm
Kaia Magnusen
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Zervigón
NamePart (type = given)
Andrés Mario
DisplayForm
Andrés Mario Zervigón
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sidlauskas
NamePart (type = given)
Susan
DisplayForm
Susan Sidlauskas
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Marter
NamePart (type = given)
Joan
DisplayForm
Joan Marter
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Van Dyke
NamePart (type = given)
James A.
DisplayForm
James A. Van Dyke
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Otto Dix, who was associated with the Neue Sachlichkeit artistic style that arose during Germany’s chaotic Weimar Republic (1918 – 1933) appropriated themes and motifs used by Old Master artists and manipulated them to address both his personal anxieties and Germany’s unstable present. He specifically engaged Old Master motifs pertaining to death, decay and women who cause men harm including the Totentanz, vanitas motifs, the Judgment of Paris and witches. He made no secret of his admiration for artists of the past such as Hans Baldung Grien, Lucas Cranach and Albrecht Dürer and his calculated references to their works were not only acknowledgements of the inspiration he found in them but also challenges to their artistic legacies. Dix was particularly intrigued by Old Master motifs that linked women, sex and death as these themes coincided with key elements of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. During the interwar years, anxieties about gender politics manifested themselves in debates pertaining to the changing status and roles of women. In particular, the economically and sexually liberated Neue Frau was perceived as posing a threat to the patriarchal social order and to German masculinity. In light of Germany’s humiliating defeat, “deviant” women, including New Women and prostitutes, were perceived as being socially and morally suspect and were accused of a variety of offenses ranging from the corruption of society to the emasculation of German men. In many of his Weimar works, Dix linked the ideas of death and decay with images of “fallen” women, such as New Women, widows and prostitutes. In these ambiguous representations of “deviant” females in which the distinctions between prostitutes and non-prostitutes are elided, the tensions between perceptions and images of prostitutes and New Women are confronted but never fully resolved. In these works, Dix deliberately referenced and ambitiously manipulated Old Master motifs and incorporated elements of Nietzsche’s philosophy in order to make a case for his own artistic legacy and to propagate a public persona that fulfilled Nietzschean ideals of the Übermensch.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Art History
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5468
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
xvi, 329 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Kaia L. Magnusen
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Dix, Otto,--1891-1969--Criticism and interpretation
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Women in art
Subject (authority = lcsh/lcnaf)
Geographic
Germany--History--1918-1933
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Death in art
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm,--1844-1900--Influence
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3MS3R2R
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Magnusen
GivenName
Kaia
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-04-12 17:55:40
AssociatedEntity
Name
Kaia Magnusen
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-05-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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