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Design of a robotic bio-sampler and localization improvement for underwater autonomous gliders

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TitleInfo
Title
Design of a robotic bio-sampler and localization improvement for underwater autonomous gliders
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Singh
NamePart (type = given)
Pratul Kumar
NamePart (type = date)
1986-
DisplayForm
PRATUL KUMAR SINGH
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yi
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Jingang
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Jingang Yi
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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Zoran
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Zoran Gajic
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Advisory Committee
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internal member
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QUINGZE
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Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This thesis comprises two parts, the first part presents the development of a robotic platform to function as a biological sampler compatible with the Slocum Underwater Autonomous Glider (UAG). The second part presents a localization algorithm to improve positioning estimation of the glider underwater. The ocean is very critical to life on earth yet 95% of it still remains unexplored. Hence, scientists all over the world have been deeply interested in understanding all the features of the ocean. One such feature which still remains unclear is how a diverse bacterial community transitions between seasons in a coastal ecosystem and how this transition affects the global biogeochemical cycles. This is because of our inability to collect water sample at the right time and space in these ecosystems to resolve the processes influencing the microbiota. One of the reasons for this inability is the lack of a component capable of collecting and returning intact biomass to the laboratory for molecular ecology studies. To meet this requirement, the first part of this thesis aims at development of a robotic platform called the bio-sampler to address fundamental questions in marine ecology and to elucidate the mechanisms supporting the diversity of microorganisms in the ocean. Our aim is to have the bio-sampler installed in the science bay of the glider. Such a mobile platform is capable of in-situ sampling and preservation on a range of spatial scales. Using the bio-sampler we demonstrated autonomous filtration of samples and running our preservation process on them. We also conducted contamination and sample preservation tests to validate the functioning of this robotic platform. The results confirmed that the bio-sampler was able to perform sample preservation without carrying any water sample from previous sample to the next one. The results also confirmed that the bio-sampler did not cause any cross-contamination between samples. In the second part of this thesis, we try to improve the localization of the Slocum glider. Underwater autonomous gliders such as the Slocum glider provide an effective platform for marine and coastal scientists for conducting exploration missions which may last several weeks or even months. However, localization of these gliders underwater is a challenging task based only on the sensors on-board these gliders. Also these gliders move slowly, with an average horizontal velocity of around 0.2 - 0.3 m/s and hence are vulnerable to ocean currents. When these gliders resurface, they receive GPS signals to identify their position. Since they mostly run underwater this makes it difficult to obtain accurate positioning of the glider. The new localization scheme is based upon the dynamic model of the glider fused with on-board sensor measurements like depths and yaw angles. The experimental results have shown that the new localization scheme improves the position estimation of the glider without using any new sensors apart from the ones which are already on the glider.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Electrical and Computer Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5506
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
x, 88 p. : ill.
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Pratul Kumar Singh
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Underwater gliders
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Water--Sampling
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Coastal ecosystem health
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3MG7MTC
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
SINGH
GivenName
PRATUL KUMAR
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-04-15 13:37:59
AssociatedEntity
Name
PRATUL KUMAR SINGH
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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