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Clinician factors in interpreter-facilitated psychotherapy

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TitleInfo
Title
Clinician factors in interpreter-facilitated psychotherapy
SubTitle
an exploratory study
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Scott
NamePart (type = given)
Sara Detrick
NamePart (type = date)
1982-
DisplayForm
Sara Scott
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Skean
NamePart (type = given)
Karen Riggs
DisplayForm
Karen Riggs Skean
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Boyd-Franklin
NamePart (type = given)
Nancy
DisplayForm
Nancy Boyd-Franklin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
In recent decades the number of persons in the US with limited English proficiency (LEP) has significantly increased. Research shows that persons with LEP experience higher rates of psychological distress and that LEP poses a significant barrier to accessing mental health treatment. As such, there is a growing need for psychotherapists to integrate foreign language interpreters into treatment. However, research is extremely limited on the use of interpreters in psychotherapy. Existing research focuses on challenges in treatment related to interpreter factors. Therapist factors and their effect on interpreter-facilitated treatment remain relatively unexamined. This study was undertaken to investigate how integrating interpreters into psychotherapy shifts the therapeutic process, with particular attention to therapist factors. A qualitative research design combining ethnographic and grounded theory was used. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with psychologists experienced at conducting interpreter-facilitated therapy. Five major research questions were addressed: (1) How do therapists conceptualize interpreter-facilitated therapy in terms of the interpreter’s role, their relationship with the interpreter, and the interpreter’s relationship with the patient? (2) To what extent do therapists acknowledge and engage with interpreters’ presence in interpreter-facilitated psychotherapy? (3) What emotions do therapists experience in reaction to working with interpreters and to what extent do they reflect on and process these reactions? (4) According to therapists, what should therapist training on interpreter-facilitated therapy entail? (5) Aside from interpreter factors, what challenges arise in interpreter-facilitated psychotherapy? The following qualitative themes emerged: the importance of on-going positive relationships between all therapy participants, clearly establishing the frame of therapy and defining roles, having regular pre-sessions and post-sessions, and therapist flexibility. Other themes included: therapists’ conceptualizations of the interpreter’s role; therapists’ emotional reactions to working with interpreters; systemic barriers and limitations; the myth of interpreter neutrality; and the need for therapist training in interpreter-facilitated therapy. The findings of this study suggest important implications for therapist training and practice, namely: the importance of being flexible; building collaborative relationships with interpreters; regularly communicating expectations and feedback with interpreters; and understanding the potential benefits of engaging the personhood of interpreters in the therapy process.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Clinical Psychology
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Psychotherapy
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Translators
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5743
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 132 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Psy.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Sara Detrick Scott
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001800001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3XP73C6
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Scott
GivenName
Sara
MiddleName
Detrick
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-07-24 11:19:26
AssociatedEntity
Name
Sara Scott
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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