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Acetylcholine in the hippocampus modulates associative learning with corresponding changes in adult neurogenesis and endogenous theta rhythm activity

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Title
Acetylcholine in the hippocampus modulates associative learning with corresponding changes in adult neurogenesis and endogenous theta rhythm activity
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Anderson
NamePart (type = given)
Megan L.
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Megan Anderson
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Shors
NamePart (type = given)
Tracey J
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Tracey J Shors
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Plummer
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Mark
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Mark Plummer
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
DiCicco-Bloom
NamePart (type = given)
Emanuel
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Emanuel DiCicco-Bloom
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Friedman
NamePart (type = given)
Wilma
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Wilma Friedman
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Pang
NamePart (type = given)
Kevin
DisplayForm
Kevin Pang
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
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Text
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theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Decades ago, acetylcholine was considered intrinsic to processes related to learning and memory. However, in the last decade or so, this relationship has been questioned and with good reason. That said, only a few studies have addressed the involvement of acetylcholine in tasks that require an animal to associate stimuli separated in time, such as trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is associated with hippocampal theta rhythmic activity and dependent on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, both of which are thought to be mediated by cholinergic activity. In the present study, 192 IgG-Saporin (SAP) was infused into the medial septum diagonal band (MSDB) complex of Sprague-Dawley rats to selectively kill cholinergic neurons and produce bilateral and unilateral lesions. Animals with bilateral, unilateral, or sham lesions were trained with trace eyeblink conditioning at least 14 days after the SAP infusion. Animals with a sham lesion made more conditioned responses over all conditioning trials compared to animals with bilateral and unilateral lesions. However, conditioned responses increased over time in all groups. Taken together, bilateral and unilateral lesions both retard but do not drastically impair learning. In two separate experiments, the effect of bilateral and unilateral lesions on adult neurogenesis and theta rhythms was assessed. Animals were injected with 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells at least 14 days after the SAP infusion. Seven days later, the number of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of animals with bilateral and unilateral lesions was reduced by ~40% in both hemispheres. Hippocampal local field potentials were recorded from another group of animals. Seven days following the SAP infusion, relative theta power was reduced in the bilateral but not unilateral group to a similar extent in both hemispheres. However, relative theta power was similar in all three groups by Day 14. This data suggests that a reduction in the number of new neurons in the hippocampus may be a contributing factor to a trace learning deficit as a result of a MSDB lesion. Moreover, even incomplete lesions that disrupt septohippocampal cholinergic activity are sufficient to reduce hippocampal adult neurogenesis and retard learning.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Neuroscience
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Acetylcholine--Physiological effect
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hippocampus
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Paired-association learning
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5998
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 135 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Megan L. Anderson
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3K9361J
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Anderson
GivenName
Megan
MiddleName
L.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-02 00:08:14
AssociatedEntity
Name
Megan Anderson
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Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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License
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2015-05-02
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 2nd, 2015.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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