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Fan, inc.

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TitleInfo
Title
Fan, inc.
SubTitle
interactivity, industry, and audiences in contemporary popular culture
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gilbert
NamePart (type = given)
Anne
DisplayForm
Anne Gilbert
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Bratich
NamePart (type = given)
Jack
DisplayForm
Jack Bratich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wolfson
NamePart (type = given)
Todd
DisplayForm
Todd Wolfson
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Sinnreich
NamePart (type = given)
Aram
DisplayForm
Aram Sinnreich
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gray
NamePart (type = given)
Jonathan
DisplayForm
Jonathan Gray
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Interactivity has become a hyped notion in industry and academic rhetoric, often as an idealized concept in which new pathways of feedback and non-professional production have the potential to reconfigure the relationship between industry and audience. While the implications of interactivity are widely discussed, its nuances are less so; this project, therefore, articulates a more complex perspective of how interactivity structures the experience of popular media. Interactivity frames how industry and audience construct the other’s identity and their own, guides limitations and affordances for users, and provides models, restrictions, and incentives that function as protocols of behavior. In other words, interactivity is a means by which participants move beyond individual practices of production and consumption to become constituents in larger systems of meaning. This dissertation considers four sites at which industry interests and audience goals come into contact, which provide case studies of different modes of interactivity. Television Without Pity, a user-generated online viewing community turned corporate venture, illustrates interactivity as appropriation. Co-option is the dominant narrative of interactivity, presuming industry takeover of authentic audience engagement, and it is in contrast to this somewhat reductive narrative that other modes are situated. Social TV check-in apps represent interactivity as motivator, rewards and incentives designed to promote particular user viewing behaviors; San Diego Comic-Con is interactivity as incorporation, as an increasingly broad range of attendees are interpellated into an identity of "fan"; and Pottermore, an online Harry Potter experience, introduces interactivity as constraint, meant to model appropriate levels of participation and contain transgressive fan behavior. Through these cases, this project considers how sociality, community, work, and engagement operate through interactivity. Interactivity is not all "good," effective, or sustainable, and so these cases offer a lens through which social rewards, affective benefits, and meaning have the potential to be align with economic goals, agency, and power structures – or to fall all together out of balance. This project considers the self-valuations made by participants of interactivity, and those left out of its structures; further, it critically analyzes how those systems of value engage with one another in order to construct spaces of significance.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Communication, Information and Library Studies
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Popular culture--21st century
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Digital media--Social aspects
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Fans (Persons)--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Mass media--Social aspects
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5889
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (viii, 251 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Anne Gilbert
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T39885HG
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gilbert
GivenName
Anne
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-09-23 22:38:06
AssociatedEntity
Name
Anne Gilbert
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-10-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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