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Post-decolonization secession

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TitleInfo
Title
Post-decolonization secession
SubTitle
the right of self-determination and the nation-state in contemporary postcolonial/world literature
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hu
NamePart (type = given)
Pei-Ling
NamePart (type = date)
1977-
DisplayForm
Pei-Ling Hu
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
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Dienst
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Richard
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Richard Dienst
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Advisory Committee
Role
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chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stephens
NamePart (type = given)
Michelle Ann
DisplayForm
Michelle Ann Stephens
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Robolin
NamePart (type = given)
Stéphane
DisplayForm
Stéphane Robolin
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Wong
NamePart (type = given)
Edlie L.
DisplayForm
Edlie L. Wong
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This dissertation presents the phenomenon of post-decolonization secession and its literature as important new topic and genre for postcolonial studies. It draws on legal documents from international law, human rights law and UN doctrines to examine the paradox within the presumably inalienable, yet context-confined, right of peoples to self-determination. Although in UN’s 1960 Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the first introduction of the right of self-determination in international law, it was set up to be the right of all peoples, it is only practiced as a binding, legal right in the context of decolonization. The UN-assisted decolonization process insists that self-determination happen along colonial borders, and newly independent postcolonial states inherit colonial territories. Postcolonial independence achieved in this manner retains the racial fault lines from the colonial era, which facilitates the reenactment of the dialectics of the settler and the native, hindering the development of a sense of national consciousness. This dissertation reads post-decolonization secession as delayed decolonization endeavor emerging out of strong (ethno)nationalist sentiment. It argues that post-decolonization secession lays bare the conditions and terms of the decolonization process, and of becoming/being postcolonial itself. This study discusses four post-decolonization secession movements—Biafra/Nigeria, Gorkhaland/India, Tamil Eelam/Sri Lanka, and South Sudan/Sudan—alongside five secession literary texts: Chinua Achebe’s There Was a Country, Chimamanda Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun, Kiran Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss, Michael Ondaatje’s Anil’s Ghost and Dave Eggers’s What Is the What. It traces the evolution of the concept of the self-determination right after 1960 and the world’s changing response to these secession crises in postcolonial regions. The literature not only bears testimony to these shifts but also examines aspects of the situation that the political and legal processes cannot resolve. While politically and legally, secession aspiration is always conflated with state-building, secession literature reminds us that secession movements are first and foremost anti-state projects, especially in the post-decolonization context. Secession literature dwells on this anti-state sentiment and pre-state phase, and suggests “non-state nationalism” as an alternative mode of a people’s political being and a new type of sovereignty.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Literatures in English
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Decolonization
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Secession
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5964
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 162 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Pei-Ling Hu
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3ZW1JD4
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Hu
GivenName
Pei-Ling
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-09-30 12:40:29
AssociatedEntity
Name
PEI-LING HU
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-10-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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