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Taming the jabberwocky

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TitleInfo
Title
Taming the jabberwocky
SubTitle
examining sentence processing with novel words
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Kharkwal
NamePart (type = given)
Gaurav
NamePart (type = date)
1988-
DisplayForm
Gaurav Kharkwal
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stromswold
NamePart (type = given)
Karin
DisplayForm
Karin Stromswold
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Feldman
NamePart (type = given)
Jacob
DisplayForm
Jacob Feldman
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Stone
NamePart (type = given)
Matthew
DisplayForm
Matthew Stone
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Muresan
NamePart (type = given)
Smaranda
DisplayForm
Smaranda Muresan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Previous research suggests people are remarkably good at processing sentences that contain novel words. For example, although we do not know what cratomize means, we know that the sentence The man cratomized the boy is grammatical (unlike The man cratomize the boy), and we can answer questions about it (e.g., who did the man cratomize?). This dissertation investigates the role of syntactic and morphological information in human sentence processing using relative clause sentences containing nonsense words, such as The actor who cratomized the critic impressed the director and The actor who the cratomer humiliated impressed the director. Experiments 1 and 2 reveal that human sentence processing is an automatic reflex which is unaffected by task requirements or presence of novel words. Subsequent experiments further examine processing of such sentences. Experiment 3 reveals that the impact of syntactic context is so great that, for certain syntactic positions, processing novel words bears no additional cost. Experiments 4-6 investigate how syntactic and morphological information interact. These experiments reveal that syntactic information plays a dominant role with morphology playing a very minor role, with incongruence between syntactic and morphological information always being resolved in favor of syntax. In addition to these behavioral studies, we propose two extensions of existing computational models of sentence processing that enable the models to process sentences with novel words. Our evaluations suggest that the integration of sentence processing models with models of word recognition is a promising future avenue of research. Furthermore, our analyses of English corpora reveal that derivational and inflectional suffixes tend to be infrequently and unreliably used in English, which may (partially) explain why morphological information plays such a minor role in English sentence processing. In the last section of the dissertation, we conduct cross-linguistic analyses that reveal an inverse relation between morphological and syntactic information. Specifically, languages with freer word-order constraints tend to be morphologically richer than languages with strict syntactic constraints, such as English. This hints at a possibility that morphology might play a greater role during sentence processing in languages that have richer morphology than English.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Psychology
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5737
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiv, 191 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English language--Sentences
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
English language--Semantics
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Gaurav Kharkwal
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3NG4P4D
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Kharkwal
GivenName
Gaurav
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-07-23 09:42:20
AssociatedEntity
Name
Gaurav Kharkwal
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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