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Pragmatic Case Studies as a Source of Unity in Applied Psychology

Descriptive

TypeOfResource
Text
TitleInfo
Title
Pragmatic Case Studies as a Source of Unity in Applied Psychology
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Fishman
NamePart (type = given)
Daniel B.
Affiliation
Clinical Psychology (Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, GSAPP), Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Messer
NamePart (type = given)
Stanley B.
Affiliation
Dean's Office (Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, GSAPP), Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = marcrt); (type = text)
author
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-School); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP)
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Clinical Psychology (Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, GSAPP)
Genre (authority = RULIB-FS)
Article, Refereed
Genre (authority = NISO JAV)
Accepted Manuscript (AM)
Note (type = peerReview)
Peer reviewed
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (keyDate = yes); (qualifier = exact)
2013
Publisher
American Psychological Association
Abstract (type = Abstract)
To unify or not to unify applied psychology: that is the question. In this article we review pendulum swings in the historical efforts to answer this question—from a comprehensive, positivist, “top-down,” deductive yes between the 1930s and the early 60s, to a postmodern no since then. A rationale and proposal for a limited, “bottom-up,” inductive yes in applied psychology is then presented, employing a case-based paradigm that integrates both positivist and postmodern themes and components. This paradigm is labeled “pragmatic psychology” and, its specific use of case studies, the “Pragmatic Case Study Method” (“PCS Method”). We call for the creation of peer-reviewed journal-databases of pragmatic case studies as a foundational source of unifying applied knowledge in our discipline. As one example, the potential of the PCS Method for unifying different angles of theoretical regard is illustrated in an area of applied psychology, psychotherapy, via the case of Mrs. B. The article then turns to the broader historical and epistemological arguments for the unifying nature of the PCS Method in both applied and basic psychology.
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO 639-3:2007); (type = text)
English
PhysicalDescription
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
Extent
20 p.
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Unity in applied psychology
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Case studies
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Positivism
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Postmodernism
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Philosophical pragmatism
Subject (authority = LCSH)
Topic
Pragmatism
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Pragmatic Case Study Method
Subject (authority = local)
Topic
Pragmatic case studies
Extension
DescriptiveEvent
Type
Citation
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf)
2013
AssociatedObject
Name
Review of General Psychology
Type
Journal
Relationship
Has part
Detail
156-161 This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Identifier (type = volume and issue)
17(2)
Reference (type = url)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0032927
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Messer, Stanley B.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30156000001
Name (authority = RutgersOrg-Department); (type = corporate)
NamePart
Dean's Office (Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, GSAPP)
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Fishman, Daniel B.
Identifier (type = local)
rucore30151900001
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3JS9RGS
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (AUTHORITY = FS); (ID = rulibRdec0004)
Copyright for scholarly resources published in RUcore is retained by the copyright holder. By virtue of its appearance in this open access medium, you are free to use this resource, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. Other uses, such as reproduction or republication, may require the permission of the copyright holder.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Multiple author license v. 1
Detail
I hereby grant to Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (Rutgers) the non-exclusive right to retain, reproduce, and distribute the deposited work (Work) in whole or in part, in and from its electronic format, without fee. This agreement does not represent a transfer of copyright to Rutgers.Rutgers may make and keep more than one copy of the Work for purposes of security, backup, preservation, and access and may migrate the Work to any medium or format for the purpose of preservation and access in the future. Rutgers will not make any alteration, other than as allowed by this agreement, to the Work.I represent and warrant to Rutgers that the Work is my original work. I also represent that the Work does not, to the best of my knowledge, infringe or violate any rights of others.I further represent and warrant that I have obtained all necessary rights to permit Rutgers to reproduce and distribute the Work and that any third-party owned content is clearly identified and acknowledged within the Work.By granting this license, I acknowledge that I have read and agreed to the terms of this agreement and all related RUcore and Rutgers policies.
RightsHolder (type = corporate)
Name
American Psychological Association
Role
Copyright holder
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
Document
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