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Studies aimed at understanding how phosphorylation and miRNAs contribute to the circadian clock mechanism in drosophila

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TitleInfo
Title
Studies aimed at understanding how phosphorylation and miRNAs contribute to the circadian clock mechanism in drosophila
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Yildirim
NamePart (type = given)
Evrim
NamePart (type = date)
1981-
DisplayForm
Evrim Yildirim
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
GUNDERSON
NamePart (type = given)
SAMUEL I
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SAMUEL I GUNDERSON
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Edery
NamePart (type = given)
Isaac
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Isaac Edery
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
co-chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Padgett
NamePart (type = given)
Richard W
DisplayForm
Richard W Padgett
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Belden
NamePart (type = given)
William J
DisplayForm
William J Belden
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2014-10
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Circadian (≈24 hr) rhythms in physiology and behavior are driven by endogenous cellular clocks that can be synchronized (entrained) by environmental cues, most notably the daily light-dark and temperature cycles. Circadian timing mechanisms in a wide variety of organisms are based on a small set of species-specific clock genes that participate in negative transcriptional feedback loops intertwined with post-transcriptional and post- translational regulatory schemes that ultimately drive cyclical gene expression. Phosphorylation is the most pervasive post-translational modification of clock proteins and is central to setting the pace of the clock. PERIOD (PER), the main repressor in animal clocks, is progressively phosphorylated during its life cycle, which has potent effects on its stability and nuclear localization. In this thesis I used D. melanogaster as an animal model system and identified a new role for PER phosphorylation in entraining to light-dark and temperature cycles. Prior work showed that the light-mediated degradation of TIMELESS (TIM), a key partner of PER, is critical for photic entrainment. My studies have significantly revised this model with the demonstration that the light-mediated degradation of TIM leads to an increase in the phosphorylation of two nearby sites on PER (S826/828), and that blocking phosphorylation at these sites causes altered entrainment, revealing a surprising new role for PER in circadian responses to environmental cues. In related work I contributed to studies that identified phosphorylation sites on the central circadian transcription factor termed CLOCK (CLK), and showed that these modifications are also involved in entrainment. Together, these studies reveal that phosphorylation of PER and CLK is not only critical for setting the pace of the clock but also its ability to interpret external time cues. In another study I found that the miRNA bantam (ban) regulates Clk through three target sites on its 3’ UTR. Flies harboring mutations in ban target sites on Clk show weaker circadian rhythms and less CLK protein staining specifically in the s-LNvs, the key circadian pacemaker cells. These findings show that ban imparts robustness to circadian rhythms by adjusting CLK levels in master pacemaker neurons, and suggest a non- conventional mode-of-operation for ban on Clk expression.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biochemistry
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Circadian rhythms
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Phosphorylation
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_5854
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xiii, 209 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Evrim Yildirim
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T30K2B53
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Yildirim
GivenName
Evrim
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-09-18 08:41:23
AssociatedEntity
Name
Evrim Yildirim
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = end)
2016-10-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after October 30th, 2016.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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