Staff View
The impact of non-emergency medical use on the United States healthcare system

Descriptive

TitleInfo
Title
The impact of non-emergency medical use on the United States healthcare system
SubTitle
a retrospective study
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Casimir
NamePart (type = given)
Patrick
NamePart (type = date)
1967-
DisplayForm
Patrick Casimir
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Srinivasan
NamePart (type = given)
Shankar
DisplayForm
Shankar Srinivasan
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Haque
NamePart (type = given)
Syed
DisplayForm
Syed Haque
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mital
NamePart (type = given)
Dinesh
DisplayForm
Dinesh Mital
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Rana
NamePart (type = given)
Arif M
DisplayForm
Arif M Rana
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
outside member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
School of Health Related Professions
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2014
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2014
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
For the last three decades, non-emergency medical use, regarded as the utilization of emergency medical services for conditions that are considered non-emergent, has grown rapidly and continues to be an alarming issue for health authorities, private and public hospitals and a much debated and studied subject by researchers and experts in the field. Correspondingly, this retrospective study was used to analyze the 2010 NEDS data set by investigating and distinguishing the characteristics of non-emergency visits compared to emergency visits. Additionally, this retrospective study identified the percentage of emergency visits made for non-emergency conditions, determined the impact of non-emergency medical use on patient outcomes of inpatient mortality, emergency department waiting time, and total emergency department charges, and made viable recommendations to the ongoing problem of non-emergency medical use. Throughout this study, five main methods of data analysis are used: descriptive statistical analysis, ED CPT severity level analysis, NYU ED classification algorithm analysis, analysis of variance, and logistic regression analysis. First, descriptive statistical analysis is conducted to detect numerical observations that are statistically significant enough to indicate non-emergency medical utilization. Second, ED CPT severity level analysis and NYU ED classification algorithm analysis are applied to the 2010 NEDS data set to probe whether diagnostic and procedural methods are statistically effective to help differentiate non-emergency visits from emergency visits. Third, analysis of variance is performed using the statistical model ANOVA in an effort to expose and uncover differences that are statistically significant between non-emergency visits and emergency visits. Fourth, the probabilistic statistical method of analysis, logistic regression, is employed to determine if patient’s demographic characteristics are statistically significant to predict emergency visits. Consequently, results of descriptive statistics show that between 54.02 to 82.7 percent of all emergency department visits were made for conditions found to be either routine, low-severity, or non-emergent and that there are statistically convenient methods to distinguish non-emergency visits from emergency visits. Also, other results of analysis of variance show significant statistical differences between the means of non-emergency visits and emergency visits. Finally, results of logistic regression suggest that there are statistically significant predictive relations between patients’ demographic characteristics and outcomes of emergency visits in 76.5% of all cases. Hence, the results of this study lead to the conclusions that a significant number of emergency department visits are made for non-emergency conditions, which can be depicted as the main basis for non-emergency medical use as to negatively impact patient outcomes of inpatient mortality, emergency department waiting time, and total emergency department charges.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Informatics
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hospitals--Emergency services--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Inpatients
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hospital utilization--United States
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
School of Health Related Professions ETD Collection
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10007400001
Identifier
ETD_6016
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3K075ZN
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (xvii, 172 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ph.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Patrick Casimir
Location
PhysicalLocation (authority = marcorg); (displayLabel = Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey)
NjNbRU
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
Back to the top

Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Casimir
GivenName
Patrick
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-10-31 15:44:43
AssociatedEntity
Name
Patrick Casimir
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. School of Health Related Professions
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
Back to the top

Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
Back to the top
Version 8.3.13
Rutgers University Libraries - Copyright ©2021