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Hydrogel encapsulation of cells mimics the whole body response to LMHF vibrations

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Title
Hydrogel encapsulation of cells mimics the whole body response to LMHF vibrations
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Mehta
NamePart (type = given)
Sneha
DisplayForm
Sneha Mehta
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Olabisi
NamePart (type = given)
Ronke
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Ronke Olabisi
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Advisory Committee
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RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Freeman
NamePart (type = given)
Joseph
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Joseph Freeman
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Berthiaume
NamePart (type = given)
Francois
DisplayForm
Francois Berthiaume
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School - New Brunswick
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-01
CopyrightDate (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2015
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Low-magnitude high-frequency (LMHF) vibrations show anabolic effects on bone when applied to the whole body in both animal and human studies. As such, it is being explored as a treatment for osteoporosis and osteopenia in vulnerable populations. In humans, whole-body vibrations have shown modest increases in the bone mineral density of postmenopausal women, children and adolescents, though it had no effect in young adults. These conflicting results prompted long term studies to establish the optimal frequency, magnitude and duration of the vibration. In vitro cellular studies have been carried out to study the physical and biologic mechanisms underlining these outcomes. But there are conflicting results of LMHF vibrations when applied to cell culture as well, with some studies showing no effect when cells are cultured in 2D monolayer as opposed to other studies reporting increased differentiation of progenitor cells towards an osteogenic lineage when cells are cultured in 3D scaffolds. It is worthy of note that the majority of scaffolds used in these studies are from natural sources, which in and of themselves may promote differentiation due to biochemical and microarchitectural cues. This master thesis seeks to explore the effect of Low magnitude high frequency vibrations on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated within a 3D microsphere structure composed of synthetic polymer polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). Synthetic PEGDA has no inherent cues and can serve as a “blank slate” to the entrapped cells. In this study, three different intensity vibrations of 0.3g, 3g and 6g at 100Hz were applied for 24 hours to the encapsulated hMSCs by means of a vibration unit. These cells were subsequently tested for adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation over a period of 21 days. There was early onset of osteogenic differentiation in 0.3 g and 3 g test samples compared to control samples, while there was no osteogenic differentiation at all observed in 6g test samples. In addition, as the magnitude of acceleration applied increased, the osteogenic differentiation of the encapsulated hMSCs decreased. Thus, LMHF vibrations with low accelerations accelerated the osteogenic differentiation of encapsulated hMSCs, indicating that hydrogel-encapsulated hMSCs may mimic the whole body response to vibration, which paves the way for further in vitro LMHF experiments with encapsulated cells.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Biomedical Engineering
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6121
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (vi, 50 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
M.S.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Colloids
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Vibration
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Cells--Physiology
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Sneha Mehta
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School - New Brunswick Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore19991600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T38K7BT0
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Mehta
GivenName
Sneha
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2014-12-29 14:58:03
AssociatedEntity
Name
Sneha Mehta
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School - New Brunswick
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Author Agreement License
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I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
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Copyright protected
Availability
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Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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