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Dramatizations of authority in Chaucer and Maidstone

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TitleInfo
Title
Dramatizations of authority in Chaucer and Maidstone
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Chillem
NamePart (type = given)
Cristina L.
NamePart (type = date)
1990-
DisplayForm
Cristina L. Chillem
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
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Aaron
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Aaron Hostetter
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Advisory Committee
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chair
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NamePart (type = family)
Fitter
NamePart (type = given)
Christopher
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Christopher Fitter
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Advisory Committee
Role
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internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Ledoux
NamePart (type = given)
Ellen M
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Ellen M Ledoux
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Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Camden Graduate School
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
This thesis examines the connections between sovereignty, spectacle, and public ceremony in Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale and Richard Maidstone’s Concordia facta inter regem et cives Londonie [The Reconciliation of the King and Citzens of London]. I begin by looking at The Knight’s Tale and Concordia to unveil the intricacies of public ceremony and spectacle as political tools for medieval rule. As spectacle of sovereign expenditure serves as a signifier of sovereignty, public ceremony serves as an occasion for displaying such politically motivated spectacle. However, within ceremony, such spectacle is not simply displayed, but becomes scripted into a collaborative performance and social drama. The signification of sovereign authority, then, is developed and complicated by the ceremonial social drama that aids the display. Therefore, the title of this thesis, dramatizations of authority, sets ahead two distinct though conjoined matters: (1) the aesthetic design in which authority is dramatized and (2) the authoritative power of the dramatizations themselves to determine political relations and the overall social reality. The more contemporary Georges Bataille, in his The Accursed Share, provides theoretical support to this examination while later historical facts encourage a reading of The Knight’s Tale for its depiction and critique of dramatizations of authority, specifically those during the reign of Richard II. Thus, after using The Knight’s Tale and Concordia to understand the design of the royal entry ceremony in particular, I focus on the critical perspectives each text posits on the medieval custom. Ultimately, in The Knight’s Tale, Chaucer mocks Richard II’s dependence on public ceremony and spectacle as a tool for wielding power as well as the reverence and faith with which masses of citizens, like Maidstone, esteemed the royal entry ceremony. The Knight’s Tale may be read as a warning to medieval (and contemporary) readers to be conscious and skeptical of the social influence that dramatizations of authority impact.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
English
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Sovereignty
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Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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ETD
Identifier
ETD_6522
PhysicalDescription
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electronic resource
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application/pdf
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text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (iii, 38 p.)
Note (type = degree)
M.A.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Cristina L. Chillem
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Chaucer, Geoffrey, -1400--Criticism and interpretation
Subject
Name (authority = LC-NAF)
NamePart (type = personal)
Maidstone, Richard, -1396--Criticism and interpretation
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Camden Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations
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rucore10005600001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3348N60
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD graduate
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Chillem
GivenName
Cristina
MiddleName
L.
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-06 15:17:58
AssociatedEntity
Name
Cristina Chillem
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Camden Graduate School
AssociatedObject
Type
License
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Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
RightsEvent
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact); (point = start)
2015-05-31
DateTime (point = end); (encoding = w3cdtf); (qualifier = exact)
2017-05-30
Type
Embargo
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 30th, 2017.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
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ETD
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windows xp
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