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A case study of the in and out-of-school literacies of two Latino middle school boys

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TitleInfo
Title
A case study of the in and out-of-school literacies of two Latino middle school boys
SubTitle
a high achiever and a low achiever
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Gordillo
NamePart (type = given)
Carmen
NamePart (type = date)
1972-
DisplayForm
Carmen Gordillo
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
author
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Morrow
NamePart (type = given)
Lesley
DisplayForm
Lesley Morrow
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
chair
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Hernandez
NamePart (type = given)
Ebelia
DisplayForm
Ebelia Hernandez
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = personal)
NamePart (type = family)
Francois
NamePart (type = given)
Chantal
DisplayForm
Chantal Francois
Affiliation
Advisory Committee
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
internal member
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Rutgers University
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
degree grantor
Name (type = corporate)
NamePart
Graduate School of Education
Role
RoleTerm (authority = RULIB)
school
TypeOfResource
Text
Genre (authority = marcgt)
theses
OriginInfo
DateCreated (qualifier = exact)
2015
DateOther (qualifier = exact); (type = degree)
2015-05
Place
PlaceTerm (type = code)
xx
Language
LanguageTerm (authority = ISO639-2b); (type = code)
eng
Abstract (type = abstract)
Currently, approximately one in five students in the United States is Latino, and it is predicted that by the year 2025 more than 28% of school-aged children will be of Latino descent (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). This is a growing demographic, yet the number of Latino males who are predicted to drop out of high school is higher than any group in the United States (Podsiadillo & Philliber, 2003). Additionally, as a group, they are not being recommended for honors classes or earning high grades in language arts class, or scoring at advanced proficiency level on state tests. This is especially problematic in middle school because students at this level are required to read higher-level texts across the curriculum. Moreover, while the Latino student population is growing in the United States, there is a lack of empirical studies about these students, particularly at the middle school level. It is imperative to add to the knowledge base of this multi-faceted group of students since they are underrepresented in research and, consequently, methodologies. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine both the in-school and out-of-school literacy practices of two Latino eighth graders: observing and analyzing a Latino adolescent low-achieving student’s literacy experience in comparison to a high-achieving Latino adolescent student at the same middle school and socio-economic level. The overarching research questions are: How do two adolescent Latino male students, one high-achieving and one low achieving, experience literacy in a language arts class? What role does literacy play in their lives outside of school? The sub-questions are: (1) What are students doing during language arts class? (2)What out-of-school literacies does each child participate in? (3) What is the nature of their home lives? This 16-week comparative case study utilized semi-structured parent and student interviews, peer and sibling interviews, classroom observations, documents and home visits as main sources of data collection. Findings indicated that boys preferred to read fiction and nonfiction books based on their choice and interests (Smith & Wilhelm, 2002) in language arts. The high achieving student assumed traditional behaviors that are aligned with being a student in class. The low achieving took on behaviors that were traditionally considered off task. Furthermore, the high achieving student had a mentor who supported his in and out-of-school literacies whereas the low achieving student did not. Both families value education and view it as a gateway to success in the United States. Both participants engaged in “non traditional school text” (video games, Mangas, online forums, & sports magazines) during their out-of-school time. This study transcends the deficit model, which often focuses only on the failure of Latinos on standardized tests. Instead, the subjects' full literacy lives are evaluated and analyzed, with the goal of more fully comprehending middle school Latino boys beyond test scores and deficits.
Subject (authority = RUETD)
Topic
Teacher Leadership
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Rutgers University Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = RULIB)
ETD
Identifier
ETD_6286
PhysicalDescription
Form (authority = gmd)
electronic resource
InternetMediaType
application/pdf
InternetMediaType
text/xml
Extent
1 online resource (v, 238 p. : ill.)
Note (type = degree)
Ed.D.
Note (type = bibliography)
Includes bibliographical references
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Middle school students--Case studies
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Hispanic American students--Education
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Language arts (Middle school)--United States
Subject (authority = ETD-LCSH)
Topic
Reading (Middle school)--United States
Note (type = statement of responsibility)
by Carmen Gordillo
RelatedItem (type = host)
TitleInfo
Title
Graduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations
Identifier (type = local)
rucore10001500001
Location
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NjNbRU
Identifier (type = doi)
doi:10.7282/T3GX4DC5
Genre (authority = ExL-Esploro)
ETD doctoral
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Rights

RightsDeclaration (ID = rulibRdec0006)
The author owns the copyright to this work.
RightsHolder (type = personal)
Name
FamilyName
Gordillo
GivenName
Carmen
Role
Copyright Holder
RightsEvent
Type
Permission or license
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start); (qualifier = exact)
2015-04-09 17:14:32
AssociatedEntity
Name
Carmen Gordillo
Role
Copyright holder
Affiliation
Rutgers University. Graduate School of Education
AssociatedObject
Type
License
Name
Author Agreement License
Detail
I hereby grant to the Rutgers University Libraries and to my school the non-exclusive right to archive, reproduce and distribute my thesis or dissertation, in whole or in part, and/or my abstract, in whole or in part, in and from an electronic format, subject to the release date subsequently stipulated in this submittal form and approved by my school. I represent and stipulate that the thesis or dissertation and its abstract are my original work, that they do not infringe or violate any rights of others, and that I make these grants as the sole owner of the rights to my thesis or dissertation and its abstract. I represent that I have obtained written permissions, when necessary, from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis or dissertation and will supply copies of such upon request by my school. I acknowledge that RU ETD and my school will not distribute my thesis or dissertation or its abstract if, in their reasonable judgment, they believe all such rights have not been secured. I acknowledge that I retain ownership rights to the copyright of my work. I also retain the right to use all or part of this thesis or dissertation in future works, such as articles or books.
Copyright
Status
Copyright protected
Availability
Status
Open
Reason
Permission or license
RightsEvent
Type
Embargo
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = start)
2016-01-05
DateTime (encoding = w3cdtf); (point = end)
2017-05-31
Detail
Access to this PDF has been restricted at the author's request. It will be publicly available after May 31, 2017.
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Technical

RULTechMD (ID = TECHNICAL1)
ContentModel
ETD
OperatingSystem (VERSION = 5.1)
windows xp
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